School of Allied Health Professions

Dean's welcome

Craig R. Jackson, J.D., M.S.W.

Welcome to the School of Allied Health Professions, where your future begins.  If you are considering a new allied health career or returning to advance your current one, we are committed to providing you a quality professional education and fostering your personal and spiritual development while you are attending our school.  We encourage all of our students to learn not only in the classroom but through mission and service both locally and globally.  We are glad you are here, and we are ready to help you achieve your academic goals.

Craig R. Jackson, J.D., M.S.W.
Dean, School of Allied Health Professions

School foundations

The School of Allied Health Professions was established in 1966 (under the name School of Health Related Professions, 1966-1971) to consolidate the administration of individual curricula initiated earlier in the University: medical technology, 1937; physical therapy, 1941; medical radiography, 1941; occupational therapy, 1959; health information management (formerly medical record administration), 1963.

The following curricula were added since the school was established: nuclear medicine technology, 1970; radiation therapy technology, 1970; cardiopulmonary sciences (formerly respiratory therapy), 1971; nutrition and dietetics, 1972; medical sonography, 1976; special imaging technology, 1976; cytotechnology, 1982; coding specialist, 1987; physical therapist assistant, 1989; emergency medical care, 1993; physician assistant, 2000; rehabilitation sciences, 2001; polysomnography, 2002; radiologist assistant, 2003; medical dosimetry, 2003; orthotics and prosthetics, 2007; health-care administration, 2008; cardiac electrophysiology technology, 2009; health professions education, 2010. The curriculum in speech-language pathology and audiology, renamed communication sciences and disorders in 2009, was initiated in 1965 under the auspices of the College of Arts and Sciences of La Sierra University (formerly Loma Linda University, La Sierra campus). The program was transferred to the School of Allied Health Professions in 1987. Policies and procedures governing programs currently offered are detailed in this section of the CATALOG following information that pertains to all School of Allied Health students.

Mission and goals

Our mission

The School of Allied Health Professions is dedicated to fulfilling the mission of Loma Linda University through academic and clinical training of allied health professionals. The school prepares competent health professionals in a Christian environment that emphasizes the healing and teaching ministry of Jesus Christ, "to make man whole."

To meet local, national, and international allied health-care needs, the school seeks to serve:

  1. Students choosing to become health-care professionals.
  2. Individuals in need of medical care or health promotion programs.
  3. Faculty and staff members committed to working with students in a Christian educational setting.

Our goals

The goals of the School of Allied Health Professions are to:

  1. Provide an environment in which the student may develop responsibility for integrity, ethical relationships, and empathetic attitudes that contribute to the welfare and well-being of patients.
  2. Help the student accept responsibility for integrity, ethical relationships, and empathetic attitudes that can contribute to the welfare and well-being of patients.
  3. Help the student develop a background of information and attitudes conducive to interprofessional understanding and cooperation.
  4. Encourage the student to cultivate habits of self-education that will foster lifelong growth.
  5. Engender and nurture in the student the desire to serve humankind—and, in particular, to serve as needed, in the medical centers sponsored by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in this country and elsewhere.

The School of Allied Health Professions has adopted the University's institutional learning outcomes.

Evaluation of mission and institutional learning outcomes—Wholeness Portfolio

Wholeness Portfolio courses focus on the student's development through assignments and experiences that are aligned with Loma Linda University's Mission Focused Learning environment that fosters transformative  learning through academic excellence, commitment to wholeness through the integration of faith and reason, service to mankind and reflection/contemplation. Course learning outcomes reinforce wholeness, wellness, values and service.

  • Apply the University's philosophy of wholeness in one's personal and professional life. (Wholeness)

    • Being loved by God
    • Growing in health
    • Living with purpose in community

  • Facilitate healthy lifestyles in self and others. (Wellness)

  • Integrate LLU's Christ-centered values in one's personal and professional life.

  • Embrace and serve a diverse world. (Service)

University students are responsible for informing themselves of and satisfactorily meeting all regulations pertinent to registration, matriculation, and graduation. Section III gives the general setting for the programs of each school and the subject and unit requirements for admission to individual professional programs. It is important to review specific program requirements in the context of the general requirements applicable to all programs.

Admissions policies and information

Program admissions committees of the University intend that an applicant to any of the schools is qualified for the proposed curriculum and is capable of profiting from the educational experience offered by this University. School admissions committees accomplish this by examining evidence of scholastic competence, moral and ethical standards, and significant qualities of character and personality. Applicants are considered for admission only on the recommendation of the program in which study is desired.

In selecting students, the Admissions Committee of the School of Allied Health Professions looks for evidence of self-discipline, personal integrity, and intellectual vigor. The committee also looks for evidence that applicants possess the capabilities required to complete the full curriculum in the allotted time and to achieve the levels of competence required. Acceptance into any program is contingent on the recommendation of the department conducting the program.

Most programs require an interview with the faculty. Loma Linda University was established to provide education in a distinctively Christian environment, and its students are expected to adopt Christian ethical and moral standards as a basis for their conduct. It must be understood further that, in harmony with the University's emphasis on health and the health professions and the practices of the supporting church, applicants who use tobacco, alcoholic beverages, or narcotics should not expect to be admitted.

Loma Linda University is committed to equal opportunity and does not discriminate against qualified persons on the basis of handicap, gender, race, color, or national or ethnic origin in its educational and admissions policies, financial affairs, employment programs, student life and services, or any University-administered program. It does, however, retain the right to give preference in student admissions to qualified Seventh-day Adventist applicants. While this right is retained, it should be emphasized that admission is not limited to Seventh-day Adventist applicants.

Application and acceptance

Where to write

Correspondence about admission to all programs and requests for application information should be addressed to the Office of Admissions and Records, School of Allied Health Professions, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350 or emailed to askalliedhealth@llu.edu.

Apply early

One class is admitted annually to most of the professional programs. Most programs begin with the Autumn Quarter. Exceptions are noted in the respective programs of this CATALOG.

Late applications are considered as long as space is available. Notifications  are generally sent between January 1 and May 15, depending on varying application deadlines, the completeness of information provided, and the date of application. Applicants should inquire at the Office of Admissions and Records if notice of action is not received by a month prior to the start of the program.

Application review process

All completed applications are first reviewed by the department chair and faculty. A recommendation on each application is then submitted to the school's Admissions Committee that makes the final decision regarding acceptance.

Procedure

The procedure for application and acceptance is given below. All correspondence is to be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records, School of Allied Health Professions, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350 or emailed to askalliedhealth@llu.edu. All official transcripts, international evaluations, and test scores are to be sent to Admissions Processing, Loma Linda University, 11139 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, CA 92350.

  1. Apply online at <www.llu.edu/central/apply>.  Be prepared to enter the names and e-mail addresses for your recommenders.  Have dates of attendance for all colleges/universities attended ready for entry on the application. 
  2. Request that transcripts of all college course work be sent to Admissions Processing. High school transcripts are required of all applicants in order to verify graduation.  High school transcripts are not required if you have completed either an associate or bachelor's degree unless course work in high school is used to satisfy a requirement.  
  3. Upon receipt of the notice of acceptance, submit the required deposit  to confirm acceptance.
  4. Send health records or certificates to Student Health Services, 24785 Stewart Street, Evans Hall, Suite 111, Loma Linda, CA 92354.

Entrance requirements

Subject/Diploma requirements

High school and college subject requirements are outlined in the respective programs. Students are required to furnish official transcripts as evidence of completion of high school in order to be granted admission to undergraduate programs in any of the schools of the University.  Applicants who have completed either an associate or bachelor's degree are exempt from submitting a high school transcript unless course work in high school is used to satisfy a subject requirement. A high school diploma or its equivalent, the GED, is required.

Grade requirement

Eligibility for consideration by the Admissions Committee is based on a G.P.A. of at least 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for all course work (science and non-science subjects computed separately), presented in fulfillment of entrance requirements for all programs in the school. A G.P.A. considerably higher than the minimum is expected because of the nature of the studies in many professional programs and the competition for the limited number of openings. In general, G.P.A.s between 2.5 and 3.0 are considered minimal, depending on the program. A minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all college transfer courses.

Student life

The information on student life contained in this CATALOG is brief. The most current Student Handbook more comprehensively addresses University and school expectations, regulations, and policies; and is available to each registered student. Students need to familiarize themselves with the contents of the Student Handbook. Additional information regarding policies specific to a particular school or program within the University is available from the respective school.

Professional standards

Good taste indicates that haircut, hair styling, and personal grooming be neat and conservative rather than ostentatious.

Grooming and style should also be practical so that the student can perform assigned duties without embarrassment or inconvenience. Specifically:

  • Men's hair must be neatly trimmed and not fall below the collar. Ponytails, spikes, and dreadlocks are not acceptable.
  • Mustaches and beards, if worn, must be neat and closely trimmed.
  • Women's hair, if long, may be required to be tied back. Spikes and dreadlocks are not acceptable.
  • The wearing of hats indoors is not acceptable.
  • Words, pictures, and/or symbols displayed on clothing should be consistent with a Christian institution and sensitive to a diverse student population.
  • Excessive makeup and fragrances are not appropriate.
  • Rings, if worn, should be low profile and limited to one finger per hand. Male students are not allowed to wear ear ornaments. If worn by women, ear ornaments are limited to simple studs and should not drop below the bottom of the earlobes. Such ornaments are limited to one per ear. Rings or ornaments in other anatomical sites are not acceptable.
  • Fingernails should be maintained in a professional manner, closely trimmed, and should not interfere with patient safety and comfort during treatments. Nail polish, if worn, should be of a subdued color.

Academic policies and information

Students are responsible for informing themselves of the policies and regulations pertinent to registration, matriculation, and graduation; and for satisfactorily meeting these requirements.

Academic probation

Students whose cumulative G.P.A. at the end of any quarter is less than the minimum required by the school or program will be placed on academic probation, and the number of units for subsequent registrations will be restricted to a maximum determined by the school or program. A student on academic probation jeopardizes his or her standing in a degree or certificate program.

Academic residence

In order to graduate from Loma Linda University with a bachelor's degree, a student must complete at least 32 of the last 48 units, or a minimum of 45 total units of course work, at this University. A minimum grade of C (2.0) or better is required for all B.S. and post-baccalaureate degrees.

Graduation ceremonies

Graduation events include formal ceremonies identified as conferring of degrees, awarding of diplomas, and recognition of candidates for degrees. Other related graduation events include the baccalaureate and vespers services. The conferring of degrees ceremony(ies) occurs at the close of Spring Quarter and includes an academic procession, the formal conferring of degrees by the president, and the presentation of diplomas by the dean of the school. Candidates who complete the requirements for degrees and certificates are invited, with families and friends, to attend and participate in these important and colorful events.

To be eligible to participate in graduation events, candidates must have completed all requirements for the degree, including prerequisites and/or corequisites, as specified by the school. In certain degree programs, upon authorization of the dean, exceptions will be made for candidates who

  • have only clinical experience requirements to complete and can project completion by the end of the calendar year
  • can complete remaining degree requirements by the end of the Summer Quarter
  • are in a block program

The still in-progress coursework may not exceed eight units for graduate students or 12 units for undergraduate students. A student who completes the requirements for a degree or certificate (other than clinical experience) at the end of the Summer, Autumn, or Winter Quarter is invited to participate in the subsequent June commencement events. The official date of graduation on the diploma is ordinarily the last day of the term in which requirements for a degree are completed.

Superior academic performance and achievement in scholarship and leadership are recognized in the printed graduation program for persons who complete their baccalaureate degree and who at the end of the quarter preceding their final term have acquired a cumulative grade point average for all college work (includes course work taken at other colleges/universities, except for remedial courses), as follow:

3.5 Graduation cum laude
3.8 Graduation magna cum laude
3.9 Graduation summa cum laude

Although the official commencement program indicates names of graduates who qualify for honors on the basis of their grade point averages as of the end of the quarter preceding their final term, the subsequently issued diploma and transcript may indicate graduation with honors if the student's final quarter record has increased the grade point average sufficiently to qualify for honors at that time.

Scholastic standing

Repeating a course

A student who receives an unsatisfactory grade in a required course and is required by the faculty to do additional work may request permission of the faculty to pursue one of the following plans. In either plan, the student must register and pay the applicable tuition.

  1. Review the course work under supervision and take a make-up examination (usually not given before a minimum of two weeks of study). A passing grade resulting from a repeat examination will be limited to a C (2.0). (See the Schedule of Charges in the Financial Information section of this CATALOG for the tuition rate for tutorial course work.)
  2. Repeat the course, attend class and/or laboratory, and take the final course examination. Full tuition will be charged, whether regular or occasional attendance is required. (See the Schedule of Charges in the Financial Information section of this CATALOG for the tuition rate.)

A student who receives an unsatisfactory grade in a required clinical experience course and is required by the faculty to do additional work must re-register for the course. Both the original and repeat grades are entered in the student's permanent academic record, but only the repeat grade is computed in the grade point average. A course may be repeated only once.

Promotion and probation

Each student's record is reviewed quarterly by the faculty. Promotion is contingent on satisfactory academic and professional performance and on factors related to aptitude, proficiency, and responsiveness to the established aims of the school and of the profession. As an indication of satisfactory academic performance, the student is expected to maintain the following grade point average at a minimum:

2.0 Associate and baccalaureate degree programs
3.0 Master's degree program
3.0 Doctoral degree program

A student whose grade point average in any term falls below the minimum required for the degree, who receives in any professional or required course a grade less than a C (2.0), or whose clinical performance is unsatisfactory is automatically placed on academic probation. Continued enrollment is subject to the recommendation of the department. If continued enrollment is not recommended, the case is referred to the school's Administrative Council for final action.

If continued enrollment is recommended, the student will be required to institute a learning assistance plan within the first two weeks of the following quarter and to meet regularly scheduled appointments with the academic advisor. The learning assistance plan should: identify the problem, identify and list the goals, state the time frame, and include student and advisor signatures and date.

A student who is on academic probation and fails to make the minimum required grade point average the following quarter or fails to have an overall minimum grade point average after two quarters will have disqualified him-/herself from the program.

Standard of student progress (time framework)

After initial enrollment in a program, students must complete program requirements within the following time frames:

A.S. degree 3 years
B.S. degree 5 years
Master's degree 5 years
Doctoral degree 7 years

Additional requirements

For additional policies governing Loma Linda University students, see general policies of the University, as well as the University Student Handbook. Students are responsible for informing themselves of and satisfactorily meeting all regulations pertinent to registration, matriculation, and graduation.

The Office of the Dean is the final authority on all financial matters and is charged with the interpretation of all financial policies. Any exceptions to published policy in regard to reduction or reimbursement of tuition must be approved by the dean. Any statement by individual faculty members, program directors, or department chairs in regard to these matters is not binding on the school or the University unless approved by the dean.

Registration is not complete until tuition and fees for the required installment are paid; therefore, the student should be prepared to make these payments during scheduled registration for each academic year. There may be adjustments in tuition and fees as economic conditions warrant.

General financial practices

The student is expected to arrange for financial resources to cover all expenses before the beginning of each school year. Previous accounts with other schools or this University must have been settled.

Schedule of charges (2019-2020)

(Subject to change by Board of Trustees action)
NOTE: Tuition rates are effective Summer Quarter through the following Spring Quarter.

Tuition information: by department
Column 1 Year academic year/class
Column 2 Units total units for academic year
Column 3 Tuition total tuition for academic year
Column 4 Per Unit per unit rate for the academic year
Allied Health Sciences
Rehabilitation Science—Doctor of Philosophy
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
Multi Year Units vary per quarter Varies $725
Health Professions Education—Master of Science—units vary (online and face-to-face)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
Multi Year Units vary per quarter Varies $775
Health Professions Education—Certificate—units vary (online and face-to-face)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
Multi Year Units vary per quarter Varies $775
Cardiopulmonary Science
Emergency Medical Care—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 40-42 $24,000 - $25,200 $600
2 40-42 $24,000 - $25,200 $600
Respiratory Care—Bachelor of Science (TRADITIONAL)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 53 $31,800 $600
2 61 $36,600 $600
Respiratory Care—Bachelor of Science (POSTPROFESSIONAL)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 48 $21,600 $450
2 12 $5,400 $450
Respiratory Care—Master of Science Respiratory Care
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 44-56 $27,280-$34,720 $620
2 14 $8,680 $620
Clinical Laboratory Science
Cytotechnology—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 50 $32,450 $649
2 56 $36,344 $649
Clinical Laboratory Science—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 63 $40,887 $649
2 63 $40,887 $649
Phlebotomy—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 5 $2,320 $464
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Communication Sciences and Disorders—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 48-54 $28,512-$32,076 $594
2 40-48 $23,166-$27,918 $594
Communication Sciences and Disorders—Master of Science (transitional program)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 50 $38,900 $778
2 37 $30,342 $778
3 23 $17,897 $778
Communication Sciences and Disorders—Master of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 33 $25,674 $778
2 23 $17,894 $778
 Speech-Language Pathology—Doctorate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 18 $14,454 $803
2 24 $19,272 $803
3 9 $7,227 $803
Health Informatics and Information Management
Health Information Administration—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 44 $18,260 $415
2 48 $19,920 $415
Part-time Units Vary Varies $415
Health Information Administration—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 44 $18,260 $415
2 43 $17,845 $415
Health Informatics—Master of Science (On Campus and Online)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 20 $14,020 $701
2 26 $18,226 $701
Coding Specialist—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 13 $3,120 $240
2 17 $4,080 $240
Nutrition and Dietetics
Nutrition and Dietetics—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 50 $31,200 $624
2 48 $29,952 $624
Nutrition and Dietetics—B.S. and M.S. (coordinated program)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 50 $31,200 $624
2 48 $29,952 $624
3 48 $36,288 $756
Nutrition and Dietetics—Master of Science (DPD track)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 37 $27,972 $756
2 37 $27,972 $756
3 6 $4,536 $756
Nutrition and Dietetics—Master of Science (for those who have an RD)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 48 $36,288 $756
Nutrition and Dietetics—Master of Science
(coordinated program for bachelor's degree graduates in non-nutrition areas)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 48 $29,952 $624
2 46 $34,776 $756
3 33 $24,948 $756
Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy—Master of Occupational Therapy (entry level)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 56 $39,200 $700
2 43 $30,100 $700
3 23 $16,100 $700
Occupational Therapy—Doctor of Occupational Therapy
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 18 $12,600 $700
2 24 $16,800 $700
3 11 $7,700 $700
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY—DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (Intense Track)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 39-42 $27,300-$29,400 $700
2 11-14 $7,700-$9,800 $700
ORThotics and prosthetics
ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS—M.S.O.P (ENTRY LEVEL)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 54 $31,482 $583
2 63 $36,729 $583
3 39 $22,737 $583
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapist Assistant—Associate in Science (does not include prerequisite units)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 57 $24,510 $430
2 6 $2,580 $430
Physical Therapist Assistant—Associate in Science (2-year track) (does not include prerequisite units)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1,2,3 Units vary per quarter; 63 total units Depends on units per quarter $430
Physical Therapy—Doctor of Physical Therapy (Entry Level)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 68 $41,956 $617
2 66 $40,722 $617
3 29 $17,893 $617
Physical Therapy—Doctor of Physical Therapy (postprofessional 45 unit track) 
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 35 $22,155 $633
2 10 $6,330 $633
Physical Therapy—Doctor of Physical Therapy (postprofessional 45-UNIT Track) - Puerto Rico
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 33 $10,428 $316
2 12 $3,792 $316
PHYSICAL THERAPY—DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (POSTPROFESSIONAL 66-UNIT TRACK) - Puerto Rico
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 21 $6,636 $316
2 39 $12,324 $316
3 6 1,896 $316
Physical Therapy—Doctor of Physical Therapy (postprofessional 66-unit track)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 32 $20,256 $633
2 34 $21,522 $633
Physical Therapy—Doctor of Science (postprofessional)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
4 Units Vary Varies $633
Physical Therapy—Doctor of PHILOSOPHY
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 30 $19,530 $651
2 40 $26,040 $651
Physician Assistant Sciences
Physician Assistant—Master of Physician Assistant
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 76 $53,732 $707
2 52 $36,764 $707
Radiation Technology
Medical Radiography—Associate in Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 35 $17,150 $490
2 25 $12,250 $490
Radiation Sciences—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1,2 Units may vary depending upon units transferred into Loma Linda University. Varies $490
Radiation Therapy— Bachelor of science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1- (w/ RT background) 36 $23,760 $660
2- (w/ RT background) 38 $25,080 $660
1- (w/o RT background) 50 $33,000 $660
2- (w/o RT background) 38 $25,080 $660
Diagnostic Medical Sonography - General/vascular (Bachelor of Science) and Cardiac (certificate)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1- (General/ Vascular) 37 $24,420 $660
2- (General/ Vascular) 32 $21,120 $660
3- (General/ Vascular) 11 $7,260 $660
1- (Cardiac) 17 $14,025 $825
2- (Cardiac) 4 $3,300 $825
Medical Dosimetry—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1- (Track A Physics) 30 $24,750 $825
2- (Track A Physics) 10 $8,250 $825
1- (Track B Rad Therapist) 19 $15,675 $825
2- (Track B Rad Therapist) 10 $8,250 $825
Nuclear Medicine Technology—Bachelor of Science (non-rad tech background)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 56 $36,960 $660
2 57-59 $37,620-$38,940 $660
3 13 $8,580 $660
Nuclear Medicine Technology—Bachelor of Science (rad tech background)
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 44 $29,040 $660
2 53-59 $34,980-$38,940 $660
3 13 $8,580 $660
Special Imaging Technology: CT and MRI—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 16 $13,200 $825
2 6 $4,950 $825
Special Imaging Technology: Computed Tomography (CT)—Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 12 $9,900 $825
Special Imaging Technology: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)—Certificate

The two-quarter MRI program is offered twice per year.  One cohort starts Spring Quarter, and one cohort starts Autumn Quarter.

Quarter Units Tuition Per Unit
1 6 $4,950 $825
2 8 $6,600 $825
Radiation Sciences—Master of Science in Radiation Sciences
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 38 $29,700 $660
Radiation Sciences—Master of Science in Radiation Sciences
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 19 $12,540 $660
2 26 $17,160 $660
Radiologist Assistant—Master of Science in Radiation Sciences
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 38 $30,020 $790
2 31 $24,490 $790
Cardiac and Vascular Imaging—School Certificate
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 33.5 $16,415 $490
2 9 $4,410 $490
Cardiac Electrophysiology—Associate in Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
1 49 $24,010 $490
2 11 $5,390 $490
Health Care Administration—Bachelor of Science
Year Units Tuition Per Unit
Multi Year Units Vary Varies $490

NOTE: Tuition excludes enrollment fee.

Supplies

Estimated annual expense of $600-$1,500 for supplies (textbooks, professional apparent, materials), depending on program and year of study.

Special tuition charges

$50 CMSD 589 Remediation/Advance Directed Teaching, CMSD 599 Remediation/Externship

Remediation clinic: Students who do not complete the required skill set within one quarter of assigned clinical experiences may need to register for additional clinical work. In this case, registration for remedial clinic is required for a minimum of one unit at the regular tuition rate.

$65 Examsoft Tech fee for Entry Level DPT, PPDPT and PhD PT

Special charges

$25 Application fee for Phlebotomy Program
$60 Application fee for all other SAHP programs. There is no school application fee for DPT, OT, and PA.
$30 Reapplication
$500 Acceptance deposit, nonrefundable (applied on tuition)—M.P.A.
$350 Acceptance deposit, nonrefundable (applied on tuition)—entry-level D.P.T.
$200 Acceptance deposit, nonrefundable (applied on tuition)—CMSD M.S. and TM, PP D.P.T., entry-level OT, O.T.D.; and entry-level M.S.O.P.
$100 Acceptance deposit, nonrefundable (applied on tuition)—all other SAHP programs (excludes Phlebotomy, which is $50)
$200 Late registration charge (if student registers later than one full week before the first day of the term; see University calendar for specific dates).
$25 Returned check charge

On- and off-campus student housing

Students may go to <llu.edu/central/housing> for housing information and a housing application form.

Awards and scholarships

Awards for scholastic attainment and leadership ability have been made available to students whose performance and attitudes reflect well the ideals and purposes of the school.

School-wide scholarships

President's Award

The President's Award is given annually in recognition of superior scholastic attainment and active participation in the student community, within the framework of Christian commitment. A recipient is selected from each school of the University.

Dean's Award

The Dean's Award is given annually in recognition of academic excellence and commitment to the objectives of the school.

SAHP Endowment Scholarship

The SAHP Endowment Scholarship is given to students who require financial aid assistance in order to attend the school.  

Robert and Ruth Hervig SAHP Scholarship Fund

The Robert and Ruth Hervig School of Allied Health SDA Scholarship is given to students enrolled in the school who are members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and exhibit a Christian lifestyle.

Cardiopulmonary Sciences

Cardiopulmonary Sciences Scholarship Fund

The CPS scholarship fund is given to students enrolled in the department who require financial aid.

American Medical Response Southern California Scholarship Fund

The American Medical Response Scholarship is given to a student who demonstrates excellence in the clinical practice of emergency medical service and outstanding academic achievement in the Emergency Medical Care Program.  

Faculty Award

The Faculty Award is presented to a student from the Emergency Medical Care B.S. degree and the Respiratory Care B.S. degree programs who has shown promise of outstanding professional achievement and whose performance is in harmony with the objectives and goals of the University.

Louisa & Peter Jezerinac Cardiopulmonary Scholarship 

The Louisa Jezerinac Cardiopulmonary Scholarship is given to a student whose patient care exemplifies the qualities of compassion and dedication.

Robert L. Wilkins Memorial Scholarship

The Robert L. Wilkins Memorial Fund was established to honor the memory of alumnus and longtime faculty member Dr. Robert L. Wilkins. This scholarship is given to a student with financial need, who is in good standing with the department, and who has an interest in research and/or teaching.

Clinical Laboratory Science

Affiliate Recognition Award

The Affiliate Recognition Award is presented to a senior clinical laboratory science student for outstanding performance, cooperation, and motivation during the clinical practicum year. Selection is based on recommendation of the clinical faculty.

Chair's Award

The Chair's Award is given to a senior clinical laboratory science student or to a cytotechnology student in recognition of outstanding scholarship and leadership qualities that are in harmony with the objectives and goals of the University. Selection is based on the recommendation of the faculty.

Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) Scholarship

The Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) Endowment Scholarship is presented to CLS students on the basis of financial need.

Dr. James L. Welch Scholarship

The Dr. James L. Welch Scholarship is presented to CLS students interested in education, research or treatment related to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome .

Faculty Award

The Faculty Award is presented to a senior clinical laboratory science student or to a cytotechnology student who have shown promise of outstanding professional achievement and who intend to pursue a career in the area of medical technology or cytotechnology. Selection is based on recommendation of the faculty.

Marlene Ota Endowment

The Marlene Ota Scholarship is awarded to a cytotechnology student who is a Junior or Senior, has a GPA of 3.0 or greater, upholds professional and ethical standards, demonstrates leadership potential and has financial need.

Moncrieff Scholarship

The Moncrieff Scholarship is presented annually to a clinical laboratory science student in the Medical Technology Program who has demonstrated superior scholarship; professional dedication; financial need; and such personal attributes as dependability, integrity, and initiative.

Walsch-Loock Scholarship 

The Walsch-Loock Scholarship  is presented annually to a clinical laboratory science student on the basis of need, leadership capabilities, academic achievement, and community service orientation.

Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSMD)

Evelyn Britt Promising Student Award

The Evelyn Britt Promising Student Award is presented to students preparing for graduate work in speech-language pathology and audiology. It recognizes students who show promise of scholastic and professional achievement.

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Scholarship Endowment

The Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Scholarship Endowment is given to students in the CMSD program to provide financial aid assistance.

Health Informatics and Information Management

Elizabeth M. Guerra Scholarship

The Elizabeth M. Guerra  Scholarship is given to a senior student in the bachelor's degree program with a grade point average of at least 3.5. The student must demonstrate a dedication to the profession of health information management, good leadership skills, and good personal qualities, as determined by the faculty of the department.

Audrey Shaffer Endowment

In the interest of promoting student involvement in the international mission of Loma Linda University, the Audrey Shaffer Endowment provides travel expenses for student clinical and affiliation experiences in health-care facilities outside the United States. 

Davidian Scholarship 

The Davidian Scholarship Fund is for female students enrolled in the HIIM program that are 30 years of age or older.

Faculty Award

The Faculty Award is presented to students who have shown promise of leadership, scholarship, and potential contribution to their chosen profession. One award is given annually to students graduating from the programs in health information administration and health information systems.

The Rising Star Award

The Rising Star Award is presented to a senior student whose overall performance exemplifies significant potential for future professional contribution and contributions to the department and/or University.

Health Information Management Student Awards

The Health Information Management Student Awards are given by classmates to the graduating students who have shown promise of leadership, scholarship, and potential for contribution to their chosen profession.

Health Information Administration Scholarship

The Health Information Administration Scholarship is given to students enrolled in the department to provide financial aid assistance.

Margaret B. Jackson Scholarship 

The Margaret B. Jackson Scholarship is presented by the department to a senior student on the basis of scholarship, promise of outstanding professional achievement, and financial need.

Smart Corporation Medical Records Endowed Scholarship 

The Smart Corporation Scholarship Award is presented to a health information administration student on the basis of scholarship and financial need.

Nutrition and Dietetics

Kathleen Keen Zolber Scholarship

The Kathleen Keen Zolber Scholarship is given to students in need of financial aid and promise of outstanding professional achievement.

Jennie S. Hudson Scholarship

The Jennie S. Hudson Scholarship is given to students enrolled in the department to provide assistance based off of academic performance and promise of professional achievement.

Martha Miller Scholarship Award

The Martha Miller Scholarship Award is given at the beginning of the academic year to a student who demonstrates both financial need and academic and professional promise.

Nutrition and Dietetics Scholarship Endowment Fund

The Nutrition and Dietetics Scholarship Endowment Fund is for students enrolled in the department to provide assistance in order to attend the school.

Ruth Little Nelson Scholarship Award

The Ruth Little Nelson Scholarship Award is presented to students based on financial need.

Winifred Van Pelt Schmitt Scholarship Endowment

The Winifred Van Pelt Schmitt Scholarship Endowment provides scholarships to nutrition and dietetics students who have demonstrated financial need, satisfactory progress toward a degree, and professional promise.

Occupational Therapy

Faculty Award

This award is presented to a graduating student who has demonstrated the values and mission of the Department of Occupational Therapy and Loma Linda University, exemplified academic achievement, commitment to service, and positive contributions to the learning environment.

Alumni Award

This award is presented to a graduating student who has exemplified the vision of the Department of Occupational Therapy to transform lives through occupation-based practice, service, and advocacy, and demonstrated leadership in sharing our vision with others.

Edwinna Marshal Leadership Award

This award is presented to a graduating student in recognition of potential for leadership and education in the field of Occupational Therapy.

Lynn Arrateig Practice Award

This award is presented to a graduating student in recognition of commitment to the practice of pediatric and geriatric occupational therapy.

Community Outreach Award

This award is presented to a graduating student who has been a positive role model and change agent, actively engaged in community service to provide improved quality of life in the local and global community.

Hamid Javaherian Memorial Award

The Hamid Javaherian Award is given to a student enrolled in the Masters of Occupational Therapy program, or any student in the Post Professional Doctor of Occupation Therapy program.  Student exemplifies compassion, leadership, program innovation, and dedication to the community in the spirit of occupational justice.  Awards are to be given upon merit not financial need.

Occupational Therapy Alumni Association Award

The Occupational Therapy Alumni Association Award recognizes outstanding scholastic and professional achievement in occupational therapy.

Occupational Therapy Endowment Scholarship 

The Occupational Therapy Endowment Scholarship is given annually to students based on scholarship, financial need, and promise of professional achievement.

Physician Assistant (PA)

PA Faculty Award

The PA Faculty Award is presented to a physician assistant student who has shown promise of outstanding professional achievement and whose performance is in harmony with the objectives and goals of the University.

Spirit of LLU Physician Assistant Award

The Spirit of LLU Physician Assistant Award recognizes students who have dedicated themselves to their professional goals, persevering with good humor in the face of adversity; have shown compassion for and sensitivity to others; have a positive attitude; and have served as positive ambassadors for this program throughout their PA program training.

The Chair's Award

The Chair's Award is presented to a senior PA student in recognition of outstanding performance and professional deportment in both the didactic and clinical phases of the program. The recipient is an individual who has consistently demonstrated qualities that are in harmony with the goals of the department and the University.

Physician Assistant Alumni Award

Recipients of the Physician Assistant Alumni Award demonstrate the following criteria: sound judgment in resolving student issues, willingness to lead activities or study groups, mature and responsible behavior, good rapport with peers and faculty/staff, and recent involvement in community service.

Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Scholarship for Excellence Award

The Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Scholarship for Excellence Award is presented to the student who is recognized for outstanding performance in the allied health professions, who is achieving excellence in his/her academic program, and who has significant potential to assume future leadership roles in an allied health profession.

The Rising Star Award

The Rising Star Award is presented to the student whose overall performance exemplifies the following criteria: advancement of the physician assistant profession, entrepreneurship in invention or learning, noteworthy performance in research, outstanding community service, interest in mentoring patients, and contributions to the department and/or University.

Neidigh Physician Assistant Scholarship

The Neidigh Physician Assistant Scholarship is for students enrolled in the department program who are qualified in their first year and awarded in their second year, have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and demonstrate sound judgement, willingness to lead, mature and responsible behavior, rapport with colleagues and community service involvement.

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy Faculty Award

In recognition for demonstrating outstanding potential and promise in the profession of physical therapy.

Jeanne Middleton Scholarship

The Jeanne Middleton Scholarship is to provide scholarship assistance to students in their first year enrolled in the MPT or DPT program and is based on the financial need and professional potential.

Jonna Hughes Memorial Scholarship

The Jonna Hughes Memorial Scholarship was established by Dr. Billy Hughes to continue his mother's tradition of service. The scholarship benefits female physical therapy students who have risen above personal circumstances to fulfill a life in service to others.

Fred B. Moor Scholarship

The Fred B. Moor scholarship is presented to a student enrolled in the department with a GPA of 3.0 or greater and has financial need.

Matthew Lynn Schrader Memorial Scholarship

The Matthew Lynn Schrader Memorial Scholarship is for PTA students enrolled in the program who exhibit: a passion for helping people, connecting with their patients, and financial need.

Physical Therapy Leadership Award

In recognition of leadership in school and community activities.

Scholarship Excellence Award

In recognition for outstanding scholastic achievement.

Physical Therapy Scholarship Endowment

The Physical Therapy Scholarship Endowment is to provide financial aid assistance that are enrolled in the department program.

Randall C. Isley Memorial Award

The Randall C. Isley Memorial Award recognizes a graduating PTA student who demonstrates scholarship, outstanding compassion, and inspiration in his/her pursuit of PTA as a second career.

Ron Hershey Student Endowment

The Ron Hershey Student Endowment provides scholarship funds for students who demonstrate financial need. . the Christian .

Thomas G. Burke Memorial Scholarship 

The Thomas G. Burke Memorial Scholarship is given to students enrolled in the Master's Degree program of the department and have satisfactorily completed at least one quarter of the program and have financial need.

Radiation Technology

Faculty Award

The Faculty Award is given by the department in recognition of superior scholarship.