Pharmacy Practice/Pharmaceutical Care (RXPC)

Courses

RXPC 561. Pharmaceutical Care I. 4 Units.

The first in a sequence of three courses that uses early practice experiences to expose students to career opportunities and issues currently shaping the profession. Introduces foundational concepts and attitudes—balanced with real-world observation—necessary to understand the practice of pharmaceutical care, the essence of being a professional, and the challenges of applying these ideals. Designed to instill a sense of professionalism, promote positive practice philosophies, develop relationships with practitioners, evaluate potential career paths, and foster appreciation for the lifelong-learning nature of pharmacy. Substantial organized, early practice experiences reinforce knowledge and skills taught in didactic course work and encourage reflection. Oral and written communication practice through presentations and class discussions. Students required to learn the top 200 drugs by brand and generic names, therapeutic and drug classifications, and manufacturer.

RXPC 571. Pharmacist Guided Self-Care I. 3 Units.

Familiarizes the student with nonprescription health care products. Emphasizes patient assessment, indicated medical conditions, pharmacology, product selection, self-administration techniques, and patient counseling/follow-up. Lecture/discussion to simulate patient encounters.

RXPC 572. Pharmacist Guided Self-Care II. 3 Units.

Continues RXPC 571.

RXPC 760. Clinical Pharmacokinetics. 2 Units.

Focuses on initiating and adjusting individualized drug dosages for selected medications based on patient demographics, organ function, concomitant medications, disease states, and measured drug-plasma levels. Addresses altered drug disposition in special patient populations, i.e., pediatrics, geriatrics, and the obese. Challenges students to critically apply mathematical modeling and clinical pharmacotherapy knowledge at higher levels of sophistication. Students apply knowledge acquired in classroom to longitudinal case study while following patients in the pharmaceutical care laboratory.
Prerequisite: P3 standing.

RXPC 761. Pharmacy Practice I. 2 Units.

The first of three quarters of laboratory course work that familiarizes students with and educates them about major issues in contemporary pharmacy practice. Teaches the important roles of the pharmacist in drug-therapy management--including evaluating patient medication profiles, monitoring patient outcomes, patient counseling, and disease-state management. Stresses the application of appropriate communication and computer skills in conjunction with these activities. Emphasizes the role of the pharmacist as a health educator. Student gains experience in other practical situations--such as drug-administration techniques, devices, and compounding techniques.

RXPC 762. Pharmacy Practice II. 2 Units.

The second of three quarters of laboratory course work that familiarizes students with and educates them about major issues in contemporary pharmacy practice. Teaches the important roles of the pharmacist in drug-therapy management--including evaluating patient medication profiles, monitoring patient outcomes, patient counseling, and disease-state management. Stresses the application of appropriate communication and computer skills in conjunction with these activities. Emphasizes the role of the pharmacist as a health educator. Student gains experience in other practical situations--such as drug-administration techniques, devices, and compounding techniques.

RXPC 763. Pharmacy Practice III. 2 Units.

The third of three quarters of laboratory course work that familiarizes students with and educates them about major issues in contemporary pharmacy practice. Teaches the important roles of the pharmacist in drug-therapy management--including evaluating patient medication profiles, monitoring patient outcomes, patient counseling, and disease-state management. Stresses application of appropriate communication and computer skills in conjunction with these activities. Student gains experience in other practical situations--such as drug-administration techniques, devices, and compounding techniques.