Global Health — M.P.H.

Program director
Ron Mataya

Program description

Upon completion of the M.P.H. degree in Global Health Program, a graduate is able to practice in the global health field with a transformational development worldview—seeking positive change in the whole of human life materially, physically, socially, psychologically and spiritually. The M.P.H. degree in global health prepares global health practitioners who are technically competent and cross-culturally skilled to create and manage sustainable health and development programs in diverse settings and populations. The program uses an experiential model of learning that builds on the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals adapted to global and local underserved environments. The program's global and local faculty and organizational resources and connections afford a broad spectrum of options for students to learn and practice global and local public health.

The program prepares practitioners who work in nongovernmental, civil-society, faith-based, and community-based organizations; county and state health departments; private foundations; public health enterprises; and public health practice organizations. Graduates also find positions in UN, international, and multilateral organizations, such as the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the World Bank; and U.S. government organizations like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Those with prior field experience and additional language/s proficiency (for example, French or Spanish) generally have advantages for these positions.

The curriculum is organized around principles of:

  • a Christian, faith-based worldview that informs activities in the practice environment--with respect for and inclusion of all Christian faiths, as faith plays a major role in how communities address adversity and make decisions about health;
  • global health within a transformational development context and approach and the social, cultural, economic, and environmental determinants of health;
  • social justice, human rights, and equity among vulnerable populations;
  • support for and empowerment of communities, families, and individuals in their efforts to attain optimal health and development.

The program is designed to build capacity in global health through:

  • a series of knowledge-based courses for broad, comprehensive knowledge of the major concepts and issues in global health, the structure and governance of global health, and analytical and program skills to design global, national, and local health programs.
  • a series of skills-based courses building competencies in program planning, management and evaluation, project-proposal preparation, partnership relationships, teamwork, communication, collection and use of community data, quantitative and qualitative research, advocacy, leadership, etc., through community partnerships and projects in the local and global environments.

Learner outcomes

Graduates are expected to demonstrate:

Analytical / Assessment Skills: Assesses the burden of disease and health status of a population* and the factors influencing health (e.g., quality, availability, accessibility, and utilization of health services; access to other services). Demonstrate understanding of global health within the context of development.

Program Planning, Management, and Evaluation: Designs ethical and culturally appropriate interventions for population health programs, including goals, measurable objectives, activities, and program budgets. Uses evidence in developing, implementing, evaluating, and improving programs and services. Prepares proposals and applications for funding, complying with global health and health care funding mechanisms and procedures. Implements population health programs and services, including monitoring and reporting on program progress and budget

Cultural Competency: Understands and describes how language, culture, values, socioeconomic status, geography, education, race, gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, profession, religious affiliation, mental and physical abilities, and historical experiences influence policies, programs, services, and the health of a population at a regional, national, subnational, or community level. Incorporates cultural diversity in program interventions and services. Seeks information and opportunities to learn about different cultures, customs, beliefs, and the perspectives of partners.

Community Dimensions of Practice Skills:  Conducts community health assessments of health status, factors influencing health, and needs and assets. Collaborates with community partners to improve health in a community (e.g., participates in committees, shares information, connects people to resources). Engages community members to improve health in a community, e.g., focus groups, talking circles, formal meetings, key informant interviews.

Leadership and Systems Thinking: Analyzes health systems in high-, medium-, and low-income countries-- comparing health system coverage, utilization, equity, policies, organization, delivery, and financing of those systems. Demonstrates leadership, teamwork, and professionalism. Reflects self-awareness and concern for the welfare of the team and its individual members, as well as the population served.

Educational effectiveness indicators

Program learner outcomes as evidenced by:

  • Signature assignments linked to course and noncourse requirements
  • Field practicum report
  • Culminating experience

Prerequisite*

See entrance requirements for all M.P.H. degrees.

Public health core
PCOR 501Public Health for Community Resilience5
PCOR 502Public Health for a Healthy Lifestyle5
PCOR 503Public Health and Health Systems5
Major
GLBH 545Integrated Community Development 14
GLBH 564Fundamentals of Community Health and Development I2
GLBH 565Interventions in Community Health and Development I3
GLBH 566Fundamentals of Community Health and Development II2
GLBH 567Interventions in Community Health and Development II3
GLBH 568Fundamentals of Community Health and Development III2
GLBH 569Interventions in Community Health and Development III3
GLBH 605Seminar in Global Health1
STAT 515Grant- and Contract-Proposal Writing3
Religion
RELE 534Ethical Issues in Public Health (or REL_)3
Cognates/Electives 215
Total Units56
Practicum
Practicum units are in addition to the minimum graduate units required for the degree
Choose one option
Option 1
PHCJ 798DPublic Health Practicum ((Minimum of 8 units/400 hours))8
or PHCJ 798A Public Health Practicum
or PHCJ 798B Public Health Practicum
or PHCJ 798C Public Health Practicum
Option 2
GLBH 797MIP Residency in Global Health12
1

This field-based course involves international travel and fulfillment of required prerequisites. A separate laboratory fee must be paid at the time of registration into this course (subject to change, if needed).

2

 Choose from defined cognates or select from electives, in consultation with advisor.

Culminating experience

See standard culminating experience requirements.

Normal time to complete the program

2.33 years (9 academic quarters) based on full-time enrollment; part time permitted

Courses

GLBH 516. HIV/AIDS: Implications for Public Health. 3 Units.

Historical, epidemiological, and public health aspects of HIV/AIDS. Viral, immunologic, laboratory, and clinical manifestations associated with HIV/AIDS. Approaches to preventing/controlling the epidemic. Socioeconomic, political, and health impact of HIV/AIDS; and the related implications in terms of legal, ethical, and health-care management issues. Laboratory/field work earned by the student's active participation and involvement in a variety of field-based activities, such as: clinic-intake interviews, analysis of existing epidemiologic databases, grant writing, health education, and hospice care.

GLBH 517. Cultural Issues in Health Care. 3 Units.

Critical analysis of broad sociocultural and political forces that impact health and health-care access and delivery both domestically and internationally. Through a seminar-style learning environment, students increase their awareness of how culture informs the understanding and experience of health and illness. Introduces students to assessment of race relations and ethnocentric beliefs and attitudes that contribute to the gap between marginal populations and health-care providers, and that teach strategies of sociocultural change within the context of power and privilege.

GLBH 524. Cultural Competence and Health Disparities. 2 Units.

Introduces and examines diversity and cultural responsiveness in public health and health care. Examines the roles played by population diversity, health professions diversity, and cultural responsiveness in addressing and eliminating health and health-care disparities in both national and global health. Discusses the historic context of social inequities impacting health and health care; and the roles played by biological inheritance, race and ethnicity identifiers, socioeconomics, socioenvironment, and health-care beliefs and behavior in health-care services delivery. Introduces cultural competency in public health and tenets for developing and applying cultural awareness in the field. Explores culture—defined as the values and beliefs that generate patterned behaviors, expectations, and world view—and its role in accessing, utilizing, and delivering positive outcomes in health care.

GLBH 545. Integrated Community Development. 4 Units.

Analyzes issues, challenges, resources, and strategies in implementing and managing integrated community development and health projects. Focuses on basic development needs of rural and urban communities. Taught from the perspectives of anthropology, sociology, agriculture, economic development, and public health. The final course in the GLBH core curriculum. Restricted to students in the major.
Prerequisite: GLBH 564, GLBH 565, GLBH 566, GLBH 567, GLBH 568, GLBH 569.

GLBH 550. Women in Development. 3 Units.

Global epidemiological profile of women in terms of educational patterns, economic productivity, social status, and mortality and morbidity patterns. Risks to physical and psychosocial health. National and international legal and regulatory issues and programs to promote access to health care, economic productivity, and the health of women.

GLBH 561. Epidemiology of Tobacco Use and Control I. 3 Units.

A module-based course (the first of a three-part series) that presents a comprehensive overview of the tobacco pandemic and provides a foundation for understanding global/national tobacco-prevention and -control issues and strategies. Explores the epidemiology of this growing public health challenge and its significant impact on societal health and economics. Examines the underlying principles governing the multi-sectoral and multidisciplinary approaches developed as part of the coordinated public health response (within the context of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control). Introduces basic techniques of monitoring, surveillance, and evaluation as used in tobacco- prevention/control programs.

GLBH 562. Epidemiology of Tobacco Use and Control II. 3 Units.

Explores the theoretical foundation for tobacco control. Considers the impact of tobacco-control policy and legislative and regulatory measures on prevalence, initiation, and cessation of tobacco use. Compares the effect of socioeconomic status variables on measures of smoking behavior among racial/ethnic groups. Reviews validity studies in tobacco use. Explores clustering of tobacco use with other drugs, other risk behavior, and psychiatric disorders. Estimates sensitivity and specificity of individual and environmental factors that influence the susceptibility of individuals to tobacco dependence. Includes issues such as counteracting the tobacco industry and forming effective partnerships in tobacco control; monitoring, surveillance, evaluation, and reporting of tobacco use and control; and developing a national plan of action for tobacco control.

GLBH 564. Fundamentals of Community Health and Development I. 2 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning and building on the global health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on improving the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Students conduct population-based analyses that include the assessment and examination of health determinants, practices, and solutions to improve the quality of life for all people—especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged. Emphasizes the basic framework within which global health is conducted; analyzes health problems at a macrolevel by conducting comprehensive social, epidemiological, and ecological assessments of basic issues that affect the health of families and individuals; and enhances understanding of current and future global threats to health.

GLBH 565. Interventions in Community Health and Development I. 3 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning, and building on the public health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on selected methodological techniques and skills applicable in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of primary health-care programs that serve to improve the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Introduces the theoretical foundations and practical applications of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of sustainable public health programs. Students have an opportunity to practice these skills both in the classroom and in local community settings as part of their structured service learning projects. By the end of this course, students will demonstrate capacity to develop reciprocal, collaborative relationships with community and academic partners; use a program-planning model and create a program theory to guide in the process of assessing community needs; use social and behavioral theories/models to guide the creation of tools used to collect qualitative and quantitative data in identifying individual and group assets and needs; conduct systematic literature reviews; develop and present a project-specific, detailed implementation proposal both orally and in written format.

GLBH 566. Fundamentals of Community Health and Development II. 2 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning, and building on the global health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on improving the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Students conduct population-based analyses that include assessment and examination of health determinants, practices, and solutions to improve the quality of life for all people—especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged. Emphasizes the role of public health policy and advocacy in addressing global health challenges.
Prerequisite: GLBH 564.

GLBH 567. Interventions in Community Health and Development II. 3 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning, and building on the public health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on selected methodological techniques and skills applicable in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of primary health-care programs that serve to improve the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Focuses on the theoretical foundations and practical applications of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of sustainable public health programs. Students have an opportunity to practice these skills both in the classroom and in local community settings as part of their structured service learning projects. By the end of this course, students demonstrate capacity to create a program theory and logical framework to provide a conceptual and practical foundation for formulating measurable process, impact, and outcome objectives and indicators; designing implementation methods; developing a monitoring and evaluation plan; constructing a timeline, budget, and work plan; and preparing a scope of work/terms of reference document. Students develop an operational understanding by implementing the proposed intervention; collecting relevant implementation; monitoring and evaluating data; and presenting a report both orally and in written format.
Prerequisite: GLBH 565.

GLBH 568. Fundamentals of Community Health and Development III. 2 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning and building on the global health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on improving the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Students conduct population-based analyses that include the assessment and examination of health determinants, practices, and solutions to improve the quality of life for all people—especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged. Focuses on the application of global research methods in response to global health concerns.
Prerequisite: GLBH 564, GLBH 566.

GLBH 569. Interventions in Community Health and Development III. 3 Units.

Utilizing an experiential, evidence-based model of learning, and building on the public health competencies as defined by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), this three-part course series focuses on selected methodological techniques and skills applicable in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of primary health-care programs that serve to improve the health, safety, and well-being of all people in local and global settings by promoting wellness; preventing avoidable disease, disabilities, and deaths; and eliminating social and health disparities. Focuses on the theoretical foundations and practical applications of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of sustainable public health programs. Students have an opportunity to practice these skills both in the classroom and in local community settings as part of their structured service learning projects. Course culminates with a series of workshops that reinforce the skills learned throughout the course series. Students demonstrate capacity to analyze qualitative and quantitative data gathered from the service learning project; report research/evaluation results through peer-reviewed channels; present intervention results orally and in written format; prepare and submit the results of an external evaluation both orally and in written format; synthesize the lessons learned from the service learning project; and discuss how skills acquired during the series could be used to address global health challenges and inequities.
Prerequisite: GLBH 565, GLBH 567.

GLBH 584. Special Topics in Global Health. 1-3 Units.

Lectures and discussions on a current topic in global health. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 units applicable to degree program.

GLBH 605. Seminar in Global Health. 1 Unit.

Issues, trends, organizational structure, and practice of international public health. Issues impacting global health, the structure and functions of government and NGOs in the delivery of public health services, and preparation to practice international health. Selected guest lecturers and student participation.

GLBH 700. MIP-Peace Corps Field Practicum. 0 Units.

Designed for students who must maintain continuous registration in the School of Public Health as a condition of the twenty-seven month Peace Corps field practicum that is part of their master's degree program.

GLBH 797. MIP Residency in Global Health. 12 Units.

Individual, guided study in operational field practice, under faculty supervision. Limited to graduate students in the INTH Master's Internationalist Program (M.P.H./MIP) whose projects have been approved by their committee.