School of Nursing

Dean's welcome

Elizabeth Bossert, Ph.D., RN

Welcome to the School of Nursing, where you will receive an education that will prepare you for a life of Christian service in the nursing profession. This Student Handbook will introduce you to the programs of the school and give you information on progression and services available to help you reach your goal.

For more than 110 years, the school has educated nurses to serve the needs of humanity. We look forward to working with you on your academic journey here at the school.

Our purpose is to provide an environment where you can gain the knowledge and skills to become a caring, competent, professional nurse. The faculty, staff, and administration are committed to ensuring that those who study here will develop to the fullest potential and become nurses capable of fulfilling the University's mission, with God's help, "To make man whole."

Elizabeth Bossert, Ph.D., RN
Dean, School of Nursing

 

School foundations

History

The School of Nursing, established in 1905, was the first in a group of schools that became Loma Linda University in 1961. In 1907, the first class to graduate included seven students—five women and two men. As the school developed and became a college-based program rather than a hospital diploma program, the baccalaureate degree commenced in 1949. The Master of Science degree was granted in 1957. The Doctor of Philosophy degree was added to the existing programs of the school, with the first class starting in 2002. The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree began in 2010.

Accreditation

The School of Nursing received accreditation by the National League for Nursing (NLN) (61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006) in 1951.  In 2000, initial accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) was received.  The baccalaureate degree in nursing, master's degree in nursing, and Doctor of Nursing Practice at Loma Linda University School of Nursing are accredited by the CCNE (One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, (202/887-6791).  The most recent accreditation for the B.S. and M.S. degree curricula by the CCNE was 2009; for the DNP program, 2012.  The nurse anesthesia area received initial accreditation from the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Education Programs (COA) in 2014 (222 South Prospect Avenue, Park Ridge, IL 60068-4001). The California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) (P. O. Box 944210, Sacramento, CA 94244-2100) granted continuing approval in 2011. Consumers are encouraged to contact CCNE, COA, or BRN with comments about the program.

Agency membership

The School of Nursing holds agency membership and actively participates in the following major professional organizations: American Association of Colleges of Nursing, National League for Nursing, Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Education Programs (COA), and Western Institute of Nursing.

SN Vision:

Transforming lives through nursing education, professional practice, and research.

SN Mission

The education of nurses dedicated to professional excellence and compassion in clinical practice, education, and research.  Loma Linda University-educated nurses will further the healing and teaching ministry of Jesus Christ through commitment to whole person care and Christian values.

Programs of study

The School of Nursing prepares professional nurses to practice with a Christian perspective.

  1. The baccalaureate degree curriculum is designed to prepare competent, beginning-level professional nurses who are committed to excellence in practice.
  2. The master's degree in nursing program is designed to prepare nurses for leadership as nurse educators, nurse administrators, or nurse anesthetists.
  3. The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree is designed to prepare nurses for leadership as advanced practice registered nurses and other advanced nursing roles in the clinical setting.
  4. The Doctor of Philosophy degree program is designed to prepare nurse scholars for leadership in education, administration, and research.

Philosophy

In harmony with Loma Linda University and the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the School of Nursing believes that the aim of education and health care is the development of wholeness in those served. Individuals, created to reflect the wholeness of God's character, have been impaired by the entrance of sin, disease, and death. God's purpose is the restoration of each person to the original state at Creation. God works through human agencies to facilitate individual wholeness.

Nursing functions to assist individual families and societal groups to attain their highest potential of wholeness. Through a variety of roles, nurses put into practice the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to care for those affected by health problems. The School of Nursing provides an environment in which students and faculty can grow in professional competence and Christian grace.

In support of the philosophy, mission, and values of Loma Linda University and the philosophy, mission, and values of the School of Nursing, the faculty affirms the following beliefs:

  • Learning is an interactive process that involves all of the learner's faculties.
  • A learning environment nurtures the development of potential, promotes maturation of values, cultivates the ability to think critically and independently, and encourages a spirit of inquiry.
  • Clinical experiences are essential to the development of professional and technical nursing competence.
  • Students—influenced by the effect of physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual variables on their lives—learn in different ways and bring different meanings to the learning experience.
  • Students participate in development of the science and practice of nursing.

Students of the University are responsible for informing themselves of and satisfactorily meeting all regulations pertinent to registration, matriculation, and graduation. This section gives the general setting for the programs of each school and outlines the subject and unit requirements for admission to individual professional options. It is important to review the requirements of specific options in the context of the general requirements applicable to all programs.

Student policies

School of Nursing students are expected to adhere to the policies of the University and School of Nursing as presented in the Loma Linda Student Handbook.

Application and admissions

The programs admissions committees of the University intend that an applicant to any of the schools is qualified for the proposed curriculum and is capable of profiting from the educational experience offered by this University. The admissions committees of the school accomplish this by examining evidence of scholastic competence, moral and ethical standards, and significant qualities of character and personality. Applicants are considered for admission only on the recommendation of the program in which study is desired.

Application

Applications are invited from those interested in attending a Christian school of nursing and whose beliefs are consistent with the mission of Loma Linda University and the School of Nursing. Priority may be given to those coming from within the Seventh-day Adventist Church and educational system.

Admission application information is located at <nursing.llu.edu>.

Admission requirements

Students entering the School of Nursing must complete Loma Linda University background check requirements, as well as health requirements--including immunizations and annual TB clearance. In addition, all School of Nursing students are required to have a valid cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certificate approved by the American Heart Association in order to take clinical nursing courses. Students are responsible for the annual renewal of their immunizations, TB clearance, and CPR cards. New undergraduate students are required to show evidence of completion of a first aid course.

Essential skills

The practice of professional nursing has minimum entry qualifications. Registered nurses are expected to have certain physical abilities as well as competencies in reasoning and thinking. The skills are considered essential to the practice of nursing and are therefore skills required of all applicants to the School of Nursing. These include the abilities indicated in the following four areas:

Psychomotor (physical) skills
  • Work with inanimate object--including setting up, operating (controlling), manipulating, and handling.
  • Stand, walk, carry, sit, lift up to fifty pounds, push, pull, climb, balance, stoop, crouch, kneel, turn, twist, crawl, and reach--within a clinical setting.
  • Assess and intervene in the care of patients, using the physical senses--sight, touch, taste, smell, hearing.
Cognitive (thinking) skills
  • Work with intangible data, such as numbers, symbols, ideas, and concepts.
  • Perform mental cognition tasks, including problem solving, prioritizing, and accurate measuring; follow instructions; and use cognitive skills to synthesize, coordinate, analyze, compile, compute, copy, and compare.
  • Communicate with others, using verbal and nonverbal skills. Recall written and verbal instructions, read and comprehend, and write clearly. Negotiate, instruct, explain, persuade, and supervise.
Affective (human relations) skills
  • Interact positively with individuals and groups of people directly and indirectly.
  • Control emotions appropriately and cope with stressful situations.
  • Respond appropriately to criticism and take responsibility for personal actions, behaviors, and learning.
  • Evaluate issues and make decisions without immediate supervision.
Task (work function) skills
  • Function independently on work tasks.
  • Demonstrate safety awareness.
  • Recognize potential hazards.
  • Respond appropriately to changes in work conditions.
  • Maintain attention and concentration for necessary periods.
  • Perform tasks that require set limits.
  • Ask questions and request assistance appropriately.
  • Perform within a schedule requiring attendance.
  • Carry a normal work load.

Accommodations for disability

School of Nursing students requesting accommodations for a disability, should consult the Office of the Associate Dean who administers the student’s program (i.e., undergraduate or graduate).

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for a more comprehensive discussion of University and school expectations, regulations, and policies. Students need to familiarize themselves with the contents of the Student Handbook, which can be found online.

Student involvement

Students are encouraged to become actively involved in the Associated Students of Nursing. Student representatives are invited to attend the Undergraduate Faculty Council, Master's Faculty Council, Doctor of Nursing Practice Faculty Council, Doctor of Philosophy Faculty Council, Spiritual Life and Wholeness Committee, and Diversity Committee, where they may contribute to the decision-making process.

Student organizations

The following student organizations enable students to participate in cultural, social, professional, and citizenship aspects of University life.

Associated Students of Nursing (ASN)

The ASN is a student organization of the School of Nursing. This association comprises all the students of nursing and is administered by elected students and two faculty sponsors. The objectives of this organization are to serve as a channel for communication between students and faculty, and to facilitate personal and professional growth by meaningful participation in all aspects of student life.

Loma Linda University Student Association (LLUSA)

The LLUSA has three purposes: to promote communication among students, to present students' views to the administration, and to assist in the programming of social and religious activities. The LLUSA provides opportunities to develop and refine a wide range of professional leadership and fellowship skills.

Class organizations

The members of the junior and senior classes elect officers and promote such projects and activities as constitute their major interests and concerns.

Honor society: Sigma Theta Tau International

In 1975, LLUSN became an official chapter Gamma Alpha, of Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society for nursing. Students may be invited to become members if they meet the established criteria.

The Office of the Dean is the final authority in all financial matters and is charged with the interpretation of all financial policies. Any exceptions to published policy in regard to reduction or reimbursement of tuition must be approved by the dean. Any statement by individual faculty members, program directors, or department chairs in regard to these matters is not binding on the school or the University unless approved by the dean.

Registration is not complete until tuition and fees for the required installment are paid; therefore, the student should be prepared to make these payments during scheduled registration for each academic year. There may be adjustments in tuition and fees as economic conditions warrant.

General financial practices

Before the beginning of each school year, the student is expected to arrange for financial resources to cover all expenses. Previous accounts with other schools or with the University must have been settled.

Schedule of charges 2016-2017

The charges that follow are subject to change without notice.

Tuition

Tuition charge--undergraduate nonclinical, special, certificate, and part-time students
$630Credit, per unit
$315Audit, per unit
$315Clinical course fees per clinical course
Tuition charge--graduate
$780M.S. per unit credit
$890D.N.P./Ph.D. per unit credit
$355Clinical course fees per clinical course
$390Audit, per unit
$1,065CRNA per unit credit
$410CRNA clinic course fees per clinical course

Other academic charges

(Application nonrefundable)

$60Testing fee (undergraduate only)
$60Application
$200Deposit to hold place in class (undergraduate only)
$250Deposit to hold place in class (D.N.P. & Ph.D.)
$1,000Deposit to hold place in class (CRNA)
Credit by Examination (one half cost of tuition by unit)
$315Undergraduate per unit credit (challenge, equivalency)
Graduate:
$390
Master's per unit credit
$535
CRNA per unit credit
$445
D.N.P./Ph.D. per unit credit
$50Early examination
$50Application to change concentration or degree program
Special fees
$788Enrollment fee per quarter
$630Per quarter for NRSG 497 Advanced Clinical Experience
Finance
$100Tuition installment
$100Late payment
$25Returned check
Registration
$200Late registration fee
Miscellaneous expenses
$3600 first year; $1200 second year; $500 third yearEstimated annual expense for items such as textbooks, supplies, student uniforms, equipment, etc.
Licensing examinations

Registration and certification examinations and license fees are set by the state.

Other charges

$200Laboratory make-up fee

On- and off-campus student housing

Students may go to <llu.edu/central/housing> for housing information and a housing application form.

Nursing and government loans

Loans are available both to undergraduate and graduate nursing students who are eligible to participate in government loan programs such as Stafford and Nursing Student Loan Program. Contact Financial Aid for details at 909/558-4509. (See Academic Progression Section.)

Nurse Faculty Loan Program

The Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP) offers registered nurses substantial assistance (up to 85 percent) to repay educational loans in exchange for eligibility information for this program and for the list of eligible health-care facilities, check <http://www.hrsa.gov/loanscholarships/repayment/nursing/>.

Awards honoring excellence

Awards for excellence in nursing, scholastic attainment, and leadership ability are made available to students whose performance and attitudes reflect well the ideals and purposes of the school. Selection of students is based on the recommendation of the faculty to the dean.

President's Award

The President's Award is presented annually in recognition of superior scholastic attainment and active participation in the student community, within the framework of Christian commitment. One recipient is selected from each school of the University.

Dean's Award

The Dean's Award is presented to an outstanding student in each program on the basis of the student's demonstrated commitment to academic excellence and to the objectives of the school.

Helen Emori King Professional Leadership Award

The Helen Emori King Professional Leadership Award is presented to a graduate student who demonstrates outstanding leadership ability in nursing.

RNBS Award

The RNBS (Registered Nurse/Bachelor of Science) Award is presented to the senior registered nurse student who has demonstrated exceptional competence in scholarship and in the clinical practice of nursing.

Agatha Hodgins Award for Nurse Anesthesia

The Agatha Hodgins Award for Nurse Anesthesia is given in honor of the recognized founder of American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. The Award is given to the graduating nurse anesthesia student with the highest scholastic achievement.

Scholarships

The School of Nursing has a variety of scholarships that have been endowed by alumni and friends. Most of the scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic/clinical performance, financial need, and citizenship. The Office of the Dean can provide students with more information, as well as with application forms.

Anabelle Mills Hills Scholarship
Angel of Care Scholarship
Aurel E. Burdick Scholarship
Bartlett (Lillian M.) Scholarship
Beaver Medical Clinic Foundation
Beverly Henry Leadership Scholarship
Catherine Christiansen Scholarship
Charlie Jo Morgan Student Scholarship
Christiansen Scholarship
Class of 1941 Endowed Scholarship
Class of 1949 Tutoring
Class of 1954 Anniversary Fund
Class of 1956B Scholarship
Class of 1959B Scholarship
Class of 1964 Scholarship
Class of 1966 Mentor Scholarship
Class of 1969 Scholarship
Class of 1992 Scholarship
Clinical Study Abroad Scholarship
Dean's Nursing Scholarship
Doctor on Nursing Practitioner Scholarship
Emori Nursing Scholarship
Fink (Oreda) Memorial Scholarship
Gertrude Haussler and Maxine Darling Scholarship
Graduate Nursing Scholarship
Halpenny Memorial Scholarship
Harriett Miller Endowed Scholarship
Hazelton Sisters Scholarship
Herving SDA Scholarship
Hispanic Student Scholarship
H. W. Miller & S.S. Chow Scholarship
Isabelle Wilson Rees Scholarship
James A. and Marge H. Jetton Endowed Student Aid Fund
JBG Endowment
JBG Endowment Income
Joylyn Jennings Young Memorial Endowment
Karen J. Radke Doctoral Student Fellowship
King (William and Helen) Endowment
Lam Family Endowment Fund for Nursing Students
Lee Pak Kim Scholarship Endowment Fund
Leslie Y. and Cora M. Low Scholarship
Linda Culwell Memorial Scholarship
Lisa Holst Crutsinger Memorial Fund
Lucile Lewis Scholarship
Marilyn Christian Smith Gearing Scholarship
Marion Ingemann Wilson Memorial Scholarship
Marjorie Low Lui Fund
Marjorie D. Jesse Scholarship
Marlene Gaskins Memorial Scholarship
Mary Adeline Farnsworth Memorial Scholarship
Maxwell/Martin Scholarship
Nelson Nursing Scholarship
Nursing Work Experience Scholarship
Officer (Ruth) Scholarship
PhD in Nursing
PhD Scholarship for International Students
Rickard Memorial Scholarship
Rosie Voss Worthy Nursing Scholarship
School of Nursing Scholarship
Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists Scholarship
Swatek Endowed Scholarship
Undergraduate Scholarship
Voss Worthy Nursing Student Scholarship
Webb Scholarship
Woodall (Harry M.) Scholarship
Woodruff (George and Ollie) Scholarship

Dean

Elizabeth Bossert

Associate Dean, Academic Affairs and Graduate Nursing

Susan Lloyd

Associate Dean, Student Affairs and Undergraduate Nursing

Barbara L. Ninan

Assistant Dean, Finance and Administration

JoAnn Shaul

Director, Office of Practice and Research

Betty Winslow
Director, Office of Practice and Research

Director, Office of International Nursing

Patricia S. Jones

Primary full-time faculty

Avery Anderson

Michelle Ballou

Elizabeth A. Bossert

Brenda Boyle

Alycia A. Bristol

Shirley T. Bristol

Kimberly Buck

Michelle Buckman

Kurt D. Cao

Karen G. Carrigg

Ellen D'Errico

Lena Dailey

Sabine Dunbar

Monica Haj

Erin Heim

Lisa Highton

Gloria Huerta

Kathie Ingram

Elizabeth Johnston-Taylor

Patricia S. Jones

Vanessa Jones-Oyefoso

Nancy Kofoed

Marian Llaguno

Susan Lloyd

Sarah Long

Iris Mamier

Kelly McHan

Lana Sue McLouth

Keri K. Medina

Bonnie Meyer

Enrique (Eric) Molina

Jan Marie Nick

Barbara Ninan

Jacqueline Paik

Nancie Parmenter

Judith Peters

Anne Berit Petersen

Nancy Peterson

Patricia K. Pothier

Edelweiss Ramal

Brandie Richards

Karen Ripley

Lisa Roberts

Nancy Sarpy

Joanna Shedd

Shaunna Siler

Selam Stephanos

Sylvia Stewart

Nancy Testerman

Fayette Nguyen Truax

Kathi Wild

Renee Winkfield

Betty Winslow

Dolores J. Wright

Ann Ekroth Yukl

Zelne Zamora

Secondary faculty

Danilyn Angeles

Richard Applegate

Carl Collier

Ihab Dorotta

Mark Haviland

John Lenart

Robert Martin

Judith Storfjell

John H. Zhang

Emeritus faculty

Margaret Burns

Vaneta Condon

Jeanette Earnhardt

Patricia Foster

Katty Joy French

Dynnette E. Hart
Emeritus Associate Dean

Marilyn H. Herrmann
Emeritus Dean

Helen E. King
Emeritus Dean

Penny Gustafson Miller

Lois H. Van Cleve

Christine Neish

Ruth S. Weber

Clarice W. Woodward

Voluntary faculty

Elva Abogado

Norie Bencito

Shayne Bigelow-Price

Cora Caballero

Glenda M. Castillo-Yetter

Jane Doetsch

Navid Furutan

Valerie Gumangan

Kim Hillyer

Marie Hodgkins

Kimberly Johns

Susan L. Krider

Jan Kroetz

Jean L. Newbold

Jennifer Olson

Shelley Park

Denise Petersen

Sofia Puerto

Patricia A. Radovich

Megan Schatzschneider

Jeannine Sharkey

Patricia Sorenson

Helen Staples-Evans

Joe Wilkinson

Gwen Wysocki

Joanna J. Yang

Joanna Yang

Janice R. Zumwalt

Adjunct faculty

Kari Firestone

John Nagelhout

Karen Tetz

Nursing - Graduate Courses

NGRD 500. Gerontological Health and Wellness. 2 Units.

Continues development of the advanced practice role of health promotion, maintenance, and management. Focuses on fragile elders with acute and chronic conditions.

NGRD 501. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner I. 5 Units.

Introduces the role, professional responsibilities, and clinical practice of the primary care adult-gerontology nurse practitioner (A-GNP). Focuses on primary health care concepts related to health maintenance and promotion of optimal wellness and common, acute illnesses of the adult. Per week: lecture 3 hours, practicum 6 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 624, NGRD 625.

NGRD 502. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Focuses on the AGNP role of health promotion and management of reproductive health and related conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 501.

NGRD 503. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner III. 8 Units.

Continues focus on the A-GNP role of health promotion and management of patients with common chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 4 hours, practicum 12 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 502.

NGRD 504. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner IV. 8 Units.

Focuses on health maintenance and management of patients with complex acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 4 hours, practicum 12 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 503.

NGRD 505. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner V: Practicum. 8 Units.

Emphasis on integrating prior learning and increasing clinical competence in primary care settings. Includes discussion and on-line certification practice testing in addition to final practicum. Per week: lecture 1 hour, practicum 21 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 504.

NGRD 509. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner: Skills Lab. 1 Unit.

Focuses on kinetic learning and practice of primary care clinical skills and procedures. An IP will be assigned at the end of each quarter until all skills laboratory activities for the clinical program are completed. Prerequisites: NGRD 501.

NGRD 510. Family Nurse Practitioner: Pediatrics and Adolescent. 5 Units.

Focuses on the FNP role of health promotion and management of common conditions in infants, children, and adolescents. Emphasizes normal growth and development and principles of anticipatory guidance. Per week: theory 3 hours, clinical 6 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 511.

NGRD 511. Family Nurse Practitioner I. 5 Units.

Introduces the role, professional responsibilities, and clinical practice of the primary care family nurse practitioner (FNP). Focuses on primary health-care concepts related to health maintenance and promotion of optimal wellness and common, acute illnesses across the life span. Per week: lecture 3 hours, practicum 6 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 624, NGRD 625.

NGRD 512. Family Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Focuses on the FNP role of health promotion and management of reproductive health and related conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 511.

NGRD 513. Family Nurse Practitioner III. 8 Units.

Focuses on health maintenance and management of patients with complex acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 4 hours, practicum 12 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 512.

NGRD 514. Family Nurse Practitioner IV. 8 Units.

Focuses on health maintenance and management of patients with complex acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture 4 hours, practicum 12 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 513.

NGRD 515. Family Nurse Practitioner V: Practicum. 8 Units.

Emphasis on integrating prior learning and increasing clinical competence in primary care settings. Includes discussion and on-line certification practice testing in addition to final practicum. Per week: lecture 1 hour, practicum 21 hours.

NGRD 519. Family Nurse Practitioner: Skills Lab. 1 Unit.

Focuses on kinetic learning and practice of primary care clinical skills and procedures. An IP will be assigned at the end of each quarter until all skills laboratory activities for the clinical program are completed.
Prerequisite: NGRD 511.

NGRD 520. Neonatal Advanced Health Assessment. 4 Units.

Focuses on neonatal assessment of a neonate from birth to 2 years of age. Additional overview of specific gestational age, behavioral and developmental assessment, comprehensive history and neonatal physical examination, diagnostic testing, and family assessment. Per week: lecture 3 hours, practicum 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 625.

NGRD 521. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Focuses on concepts and principles of genetics, embryology, growth and development, physiology/ pathophysiology, and pharmacology/ toxicology as relevant to the assessment and management of the health promotion and maintenance needs of the newborn. Per week: theory 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; clinical 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 520, NGRD 623, NGRD 625.

NGRD 522. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner II. 4 Units.

Focuses on concepts and principles of pathophysiology, neonatal disease entities, and disorders in relation to the clinical management of the sick and growing neonate in the NICU. Understanding the morbidities and follow-up care needed. Per week: theory 3 hours; clinical 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 521.

NGRD 523. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner III. 5 Units.

Focuses on concepts and principles of pathophysiology and neonatal disease entities and disorders in the management of the acutely ill neonate. Emphasis on assessment, diagnosis, and prioritization of the acutely ill neonate. Understanding the common morbidities of the premature infant. Per week: theory 3 hours; clinical 6 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 522.

NGRD 524. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner IV. 8 Units.

Synthesizes concepts, principles, theories, knowledge, and skills from the preceding advanced neonatal critical care nursing courses to practice. The use of specific interventions and diagnostic procedures of a critically ill and high-risk neonate. Using diagnostic reasoning to create a management plan for the critically ill neonate, with focus on neurodevelopmental needs and enhancing developmental outcomes. Per week: theory 4 hours; clinical 12 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 523.

NGRD 525. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner V. 8 Units.

Synthesizes concepts, principles, theories, knowledge, and skills from the preceding advanced neonatal critical care nursing courses to practice. Emphasis on assessment and management of neonates in the NICU, with direct collaboration with physicians. Additional multidisciplinary collaboration used for management of the neonates and family-centered care. Per week: theory 4 hours; clinical 12 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 524.

NGRD 526. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner VI: Practicum. 9 Units.

Emphasis on clinical competency in the neonatal nurse practitioner role. Focus on stabilization and management of the critically ill neonate and multi-organ complications in the NICU. Management of a caseload of high-risk neonates and their family. Includes discussion and certification practice testing in addition to final practicum. Per week: theory 1 hour; clinical 24 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 525.

NGRD 531. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Focuses on basic primary health-care concepts of children from birth through 21 years of age related to health maintenance and promotion. Emphasis on learning developmental milestones, childhood immunizations, and prescription writing. Introduction to the role of a pediatric nurse practitioner in the community. Per week: theory 3 hours; practicum 3 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 624, NGRD 625.

NGRD 532. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Continues development of the PNP primary care role for children from birth through 21 years of age, related to assessment and management of common or acute illnesses, while incorporating health maintenance and prevention. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 531.

NGRD 533. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner III. 6 Units.

Continues development of the PNP primary care role in screening, assessment, and management of chronic diseases in children from birth through 21 years of age. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 90 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 532.

NGRD 534. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner IV. 6 Units.

Emphasizes the assessment and management of children from birth to 21 years of age with rare complex chronic health problems such as genetic syndromes and children with special needs. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 533.

NGRD 535. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner V. 6 Units.

Emphasizes the development of advanced clinical skills in conjunction with the advance practice role. Discusses health-care issues related to policy, ethics/ culture, and research. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 534.

NGRD 536. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner VI: Practicum. 7 Units.

Focuses on integration and synthesis of knowledge and skills under the guidance of an expert preceptor, with the goal of working independently and collaboratively within a health-care team. Includes discussion and certification practice testing in addition to final practicum. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 18 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 535.

NGRD 539. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner: Skills Lab. 1 Unit.

This skills lab is designed to equip pediatric nurse practitioner students with common ambulatory care skills most often used in pediatric primary care clinics. An IP will be assigned at the end of each quarter until all skills lab activities for the clinical program are completed.

NGRD 541. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Focuses on psychopharmacology principles and treatment in clinical management of psychiatric disorders and symptoms across the life span. Per week: theory 3 hours; clinical 3 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 624, NGRD 625.

NGRD 542. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Focuses on mental health promotion and assessment of psychiatric disorders occurring in children, adolescents, adults, and families across the life span. Per week: theory 3 hours, clinical 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 541.

NGRD 543. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner III. 6 Units.

Focuses on modalities of evidence-based treatment of children, adolescents, and family with common, chronic, and complex psychopathology; and on clinical experience in the assessment and management of these psychiatric disorders. Per week: theory: 3 hours, clinical 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 542.

NGRD 544. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner IV. 6 Units.

Focuses on modalities of evidence-based treatment of the adult, geriatric, and family with common, chronic, and complex psychopathology; and on clinical experience in the assessment and management of these psychiatric disorders. Per week: theory 3 hours, clinical 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 543.

NGRD 545. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner V. 6 Units.

Focuses on modalities of evidence-based psychotherapies, as well as complementary and alternative approaches across the lifespan—with emphasis on select psychiatric disorders, community psychiatric populations, and brief solution-oriented psychotherapy.
Prerequisite: NGRD 544.

NGRD 546. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner VI: Practicum. 7 Units.

Final clinical practicum with opportunity to develop autonomy while working with preceptors in clinical settings. Focuses on integration of learning from all prior psychiatric nurse practitioner courses and clinical experiences. Includes discussion and certification practice testing in addition to final practicum. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 18 hours.

NGRD 549. Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner VII: Skills Laboratory. 1 Unit.

Focuses on practice of psychiatric care clinical skills and procedures.

NGRD 551. Adult - Gerontology: CNS I. 4 Units.

Focuses on theoretical basis of advanced nursing practice for adult and aging clients related to health-care delivery and continuity of chronic illness care in vulnerable populations. Contents applied to selected client populations.
Prerequisite: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 625.

NGRD 552. Adult - Gerontology: CNS II. 4 Units.

Focuses on the physiological basis of advanced practice nursing care of adult and aging clients with specific acute and chronic health conditions. Utilizes a systems approach to the management of complex patient problems.
Prerequisite: NGRD 551.

NGRD 553. Adult - Gerontology: CNS III. 4 Units.

Focuses on issues relevant to the clinical nurse specialist caring for the adult and aging client. Includes topics and applications relevant to organization leadership, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, collaboration, consultation, finances, and other concepts necessary for CNS role implementation. Per week: theory 2 hours, clinical 6 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 552.

NGRD 554. Adult - Gerontology: CNS Clinical Practicum. 2-8 Units.

Experiential learning of the advanced practice role under the guidance of faculty and clinical experts in the area of adult and aging. Emphasizes the clinical competencies outlined by AACN. Per week: clinical hours variable.
Prerequisite: NGRD 553.

NGRD 561. Pediatrics: CNS I. 4 Units.

Focuses on theoretical basis of advanced nursing practice for the child and family related to health-care delivery and continuity of chronic illness care in vulnerable populations. Students apply content to selected client populations.
Prerequisite: NGRD 621, NGRD 622, NGRD 625.

NGRD 562. Pediatrics: CNS II. 4 Units.

Focuses on the pathophysiological basis of advanced practice nursing care of the child with specific acute and chronic health conditions. Utilizes a systems approach to the management of complex patient problems.

NGRD 563. Pediatrics: CNS III. 4 Units.

Focuses on issues relevant to the clinical nurse specialist caring for the child and family. Includes topics and applications relevant to organization leadership, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, collaboration, consultation, finances, and other concepts necessary for CNS role implementation. Per week: theory 2 hours, clinical 6 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 562.

NGRD 564. Pediatrics:CNS Clinical Practicum. 2-8 Units.

Experiential learning of the CNS advanced practice role under the guidance of faculty and clinical experts in the area of the child and family. Emphasizes the clinical competencies outlined by AACN. Per week: clinical hours variable.

NGRD 580. Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Anesthetists. 4 Units.

Focuses on health history and physical assessment as they relate to the perioperative patient population. Includes invasive and noninvasive systems assessment and diagnostic methods. Principles and application of health promotion strategies for the CRNA population.

NGRD 600. Teaching and Learning Theory. 3 Units.

Explores the components of the teaching-learning process, including traditional and current modalities. Provides opportunities for students to practice specific teaching strategies.

NGRD 601. Curriculum Development in Higher Education. 3 Units.

Emphasizes the basic principles of curriculum building (needs assessment, program planning, implementation, and evaluation) within the context of the purposes, trends, and issues of the undergraduate curriculum in higher education. Considers content in nursing science and physical therapy and related disciplines in the context of the philosophical base and nursing and physical therapy theory. Synthesizes knowledge and application through a curriculum development project.

NGRD 602. Assessment of Learning Outcomes. 3 Units.

Explores methods of assessing classroom and clinical performance in nursing. Assists students in developing measurement instruments that assess clinical reasoning. Discusses test administration, results analysis, and appropriate feedback. Addresses social, ethical, and legal issues related to evaluation, testing, and grading.

NGRD 603. Educational Leadership. 2 Units.

Focuses on development of leadership skills within the nursing education arena that facilitates quality education. Explores the processes of moving from a nurse faculty role to a leadership role with a perspective toward developing educational approaches that meet current and future needs of students and facilitate the development of nursing faculty. Learned leadership to advance nursing education by being involved with others, being authentic, and creating an environment for change.

NGRD 604. Teaching Practicum. 3 Units.

Assists the student in developing the ability to teach both theory and clinical components in the specialty area of choice. Emphasizes the nurse teacher as facilitator of learning. Integrates expected knowledge and skills related to educational methodology and clinical nursing. Practice teaching done in the classroom and clinical setting. Per week: theory 0 hours, practicum 9-12 hours.
Prerequisite: NGRD 600.

NGRD 605. Clinical Practicum: Nurse Educator. 3 Units.

Focuses on in-depth clinical expertise in selected area of nursing practice. Considers strategies to use clinical expertise in facilitating future nursing students' learning.

NGRD 606. Nursing Administration Practicum. 1-10 Units.

Provides opportunities for the ongoing development and refinement of leadership capability in selected areas of nursing administration. Students showcase competencies in the synthesis and application of nursing, management, economic, and human resources theories to solve real-world issues of importance to the profession and the workplace. Per week: lecture 0 hours, practicum 3-30 hours. Prerequisites: NGRD 652; HADM 528.

NGRD 610. Master's Comprehensive Project. 2 Units.

Comprehensive project based on a PICOT question as appropriate for focus area of study.
Prerequisite: NGRD 651, NGRD 658; Completion of clinical courses required for concentration area.

NGRD 621. Pharmacology in Advanced Practice I. 2 Units.

Principles of pharmacodynamics, pharmacotherapeutics, and pharmacokinetics. Overview of specific major drug classifications, discussion of the therapeutic use of drugs, and application to medical conditions. Addresses specific legal and ethical issues for advanced practice.

NGRD 622. Pharmacology in Advanced Practice II. 3 Units.

Builds on principles discussed in NGRD 621, with a focus on additional specific major drug classifications, discussion of the therapeutic use of these drugs, and application to medical conditions.
Prerequisite: NGRD 621.

NGRD 623. Neonatal Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Advanced principles of neonatal pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. Additional overview of specific drug classifications within the neonatal population. Prerequisite NGRD 621.

NGRD 624. Advanced Health Assessment. 4 Units.

Focuses on advanced health assessment skills and knowledge necessary to successfully conduct a comprehensive history and physical throughout the lifespan. Emphasizes a wholistic plan of care, including health promotion strategies, while considering cultural and developmental variations of the patient.

NGRD 625. Advanced Clinical Pathophysiology. 4 Units.

Provides graduate students with an integrated understanding of normal human physiology and the most common pathological changes that occur throughout the lifespan. Focuses on using pathophysiological concepts to explain clinical observations and management.

NGRD 629. Selected Topics. 1-4 Units.

Lecture and discussion of a current topic in graduate nursing bearing on the theory or practice of one aspect of the discipline. Specific content varies from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for additional credit.

NGRD 650. Advanced Role Development and Collaboration. 4 Units.

Focuses on transition to advanced practice and Doctor of Nursing Practice role. Topics include advanced practice nursing, theoretical bases, competencies, interprofessional collaboration, legal requirements, evidence-based practice, and professional writing.

NGRD 651. Theoretical Foundations for Evidence-Based Practice. 4 Units.

Focuses on the philosophical, theoretical, and scientific foundations of nursing practice. Examines evidence-based models and theories for use in clinical decision making and program development.

NGRD 652. Health-Care Systems Leadership. 4 Units.

Applies leadership theories and organizational models to complex professional and systems issues addressed by the advanced practice nursing leader. Focuses on development of leadership competencies for quality health care.

NGRD 653. Health Systems Policy Development and Advocacy. 4 Units.

Evaluates the impact of sociopolitical systems/processes within the context of current trends and issues affecting population health. Explores the impact of nursing on systems in the workplace, community, professional organizations, and government. Emphasizes strategic planning, policy formation, and advocacy.

NGRD 654. Social Determinants of Health. 4 Units.

Examines factors that contribute to disease prevention, health promotion, and well-being in vulnerable and diverse populations. Analyzes models, programs, and systems that address assessment, implementation, and evaluation for safe, equitable, culturally competent, and just health care.

NGRD 655. Health Systems Finance. 4 Units.

Focuses on health-care economics and finance—including evaluation of financial reports, business plans, and cost-benefit analyses of care-delivery systems. Explores strategies for optimizing fiscal resources to ensure safe patient care and best practices.

NGRD 656. Outcomes Assessment for Strategic Planning. 4 Units.

Examines and evaluates patient outcomes across the health-care system. Considers strategic planning, quality improvement, and information and technology systems that promote excellence in nursing practice.

NGRD 657. Intermediate Statistics for Translational Nursing Research. 4 Units.

Topics in intermediate statistics—including ANOVA, multiple regression, other multivariate statistical procedures, and interpreting computer output. Applies statistical analysis in translational research.

NGRD 658. Translational Research for Advanced Practice. 4 Units.

Applies qualitative and quantitative research to the improvement of nursing practice.

NGRD 659A. Writing for Publication I. 1 Unit.

First of a three-course mentored writing experience that includes information, resources, and guidance that facilitate development of a publishable manuscript.

NGRD 659B. Writing for Publication II. 1 Unit.

Second of a three-course mentored writing experience that includes information, resources, and guidance that facilitate development of a publishable manuscript.
Prerequisite: NGRD 659A.

NGRD 659C. Writing for Publication III. 2 Units.

Third of a three-course mentored writing experience that includes information, resources, and guidance that facilitate development of a publishable manuscript.
Prerequisite: NGRD 658, NGRD 658B.

NGRD 660. Integrative Leadership Case Study. 1-6 Units.

Focuses on integration of advanced concepts for DNP practice. Provides opportunity to extend learning from previous academic work to achieve the knowledge needed for the D.N.P. degree. Course may be processed as an IP but must be completed before beginning NGRD 667 DNP Proposal Development.

NGRD 667. DNP Proposal Development. 3 Units.

Examines the Iowa Model of Research in Practice (IMRP) guidelines and process to systematically develop the approach for implementation of an evidence-based project to improve patient care quality. Includes identification of the EBP question, the search for evidence, and steps for effective translation of the project into the specific practice setting.

NGRD 669A. DNP Practice Inquiry Project I. 4 Units.

The first of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student focuses on identifying and describing in detail the project problem, forming the project guidance committee and project team in the practice setting, and beginning development of the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.

NGRD 669B. DNP Practice Inquiry Project II. 4 Units.

The second of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student comprehensively reviews and critiques relevant literature, works through the IRB approval process, and continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite: NGRD 669A.

NGRD 669C. DNP Practice Inquiry Project III. 2 Units.

The third of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student pilots the project in the practice setting, and continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite: NGRD 669B.

NGRD 669D. DNP Practice Inquiry Project IV. 2 Units.

The fourth of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student implements the change project using appropriate communication strategies with key personnel and adapts change strategies appropriately, while continuing to develop the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite: NGRD 669C.

NGRD 669E. DNP Practice Inquiry Project V. 2 Units.

The fifth of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student monitors and analyzes the change project, evaluates key variables, implements adjustments as needed, identifies implications for future work. Student continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite: NGRD 669D.

NGRD 669F. DNP Practice Inquiry Project VI. 2 Units.

The last of six courses in the development of the DNP project. Student develops results for dissemination through publication and presentation, and completes the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite: NGRD 669E.

NGRD 680. Strategies for Theory Development in Nursing. 4 Units.

Engages the student in examining and applying the process of concept and theory development. Students analyze phenomena of interest, use selected strategies to construct conceptual relationships, and evaluate theoretical frameworks for development of nursing science.

NGRD 681. Philosophical Foundations of Nursing Science. 4 Units.

Explores the development of scientific thought and knowledge. Examines sources of knowledge and the assumptions underlying major approaches to scientific inquiry. Critiques these approaches in relation to knowledge development of nursing science.

NGRD 682. Methods of Disciplined Inquiry. 2 Units.

Provides an overview of formal methods of inquiry and explores the responsibility of doctorally prepared nurses for the future of nursing knowledge. Helps students build a foundation for a program of formal scholarly inquiry in an identified area of interest. D. degree program in the School of Nursing; or consent of instructor.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Ph.

NGRD 683. Mentored Research. 2 Units.

Student participates in the research process or engages in research activities guided by mentors. Experience contributes to ongoing development of the student's knowledge in research planning, design conduct, analysis, or dissemination. Research activity may continue beyond one quarter (IP eligible). Acceptance into the Ph.D. degree program in nursing.

NGRD 684. Advanced Quantitative Research Methods. 4 Units.

Examines advanced quantitative research methods applicable to advancing and developing nursing science. Topics range from the formulation of research problems and questions to discussing and identifying complex designs and methods. Guides the student in development of a quantitative research proposal that focuses on an area of study that may serve as the initial step in conducting independent dissertation research.
Prerequisite: Minimum of one doctoral-level statistics course, or equivalent.

NGRD 685. Advanced Qualitative Research Methods. 4 Units.

Advanced course in qualitative research methods. Emphasizes selected qualitative and mixed research methodologies specific to social, clinical, and health services research. Topics covered include theoretical bases for conducting qualitative research; research design; data gathering, including interviewing, observation, archival and historical research, and data analysis and writing. Introduces various approaches for integrating qualitative and quantitative methodologies. NGRD 681, NGRD 682.

NGRD 686. Applied Psychometrics for Health Care. 4 Units.

Advanced study of psychological tests and application in the health sciences. Includes review of prerequisite basic statistics (correlation and regression) and an introduction to more advanced analyses important to test development and evaluation (exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis). Focuses on methods of test development; procedures for evaluating psychometric adequacy (reliability, validity, and generalization); and practical issues in the use and interpretation of test scores (scoring, cultural diversity, and test bias).
Prerequisite: STAT 531 or equivalent.

NGRD 687. LLU Scholars Seminar. 1 Unit.

Online seminar that provides students with a forum for systematic scholarly discussion of their developing role as Ph.D.-prepared stewards of the nursing profession. Helps students integrate and apply core content to their role, philosophy, and research emphasis while exchanging and critiquing ideas in a professional and collegial setting. Progresses from role transition through dissertation support over the course of four years. D. degree program; or consent of instructor.
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.

NGRD 688. Nursing Science Seminar. 1 Unit.

Nursing phenomena. Focus varies according to national emphases in nursing research and focus areas of participants. Emphasizes critical examination of conceptual, theoretical, and methodological issues relative to the selective topic.
Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or consent of instructor.

NGRD 689. Spiritual Care: Theory, Research and Practice. 3,4 Units.

Examines spirituality and religiosity in the context of health and illness, and provides or coaches others in providing spiritually sensitive health care. Emphasizes empirical, personal, and ethical sources of knowledge about spirituality and religiosity, using knowledge generated in health care, psychology, anthropology, and other fields. Additional project required for fourth unit.

NGRD 696. Master's Thesis. 1-5 Units.

Completion of the requirements of the master's thesis. Prerequisites: NGRD 657; NGRD 658; approval of advisor.

NGRD 697. Dissertation Research. 1-8 Units.

Development, conduct, analysis, and defense of dissertation research. IP may be applied as needed, depending on the progress of the work.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Comprehensive Examination.

NGRD 699. Guided Study. 1-6 Units.

Opportunity for intensive study in a selected area of nursing, under faculty direction.

Nursing Courses

NRSG 214. Fundamentals of Professional Nursing. 8 Units.

Introduces the profession of nursing. Emphasizes the basic health needs of the adult-client system, with the goal of optimal wellness/wholeness. Identifies stressors to the client system's lines of defense. Develops beginning-nursing decision-making skills. Supervised experience in application of nursing knowledge to adult-client systems in acute-care settings. Socializes into the role of professional nursing, including exploration of historical, ethical, cultural, and legal aspects. Current issues in professional nursing/health care.

NRSG 216. Basic Nursing Skills and Health Assessment. 4 Units.

Introduces the basic skills required to assess, maintain, and strengthen client lines of resistance and defense. Supervised practice in communication skills and nursing interventions to achieve optimal client wellness. Foundation to clinical decision-making and client education. General concepts and techniques for performing a head-to-toe physical examination and proper documentation of assessment findings.

NRSG 217. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. 6 Units.

Introduces care of the client presenting with psychiatric mental health symptoms. Emphasizes primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions to increase resilience and strengthen lines of defense/resistance for the client. Clinical experiences focus on communication skills, the nurse-patient relationship, and application of the nursing process in the management of the individual client system.
Prerequisite: NRSG 214, NRSG 216.

NRSG 224. Nursing Pathophysiology. 4 Units.

Overview of the physiological function of a client system under stress, the common stressors that threaten system stability/integrity, and the consequences that result to the individual whose lines of resistance and defense are breached. Foundation for understanding the rationale behind assessment findings and nursing intervention.

NRSG 225. LVN Bridge Course. 4 Units.

Designed for the LVN transfer student. Content includes introduction to baccalaureate nursing, physical assessment, and gerontology.

NRSG 226. LVN Bridge Course for Physical Assessment. 2 Units.

Designed for the LVN transfer student. Content includes an introduction to baccalaureate nursing and physical assessment.

NRSG 227. LVN Bridge Course for Gerontological Nursing. 2 Units.

Designed for the LVN transfer student. Content includes an introduction to baccalaureate nursing and gerontology.

NRSG 244. Strategies for Academic Success. 1 Unit.

Assessment of student's learning needs, with individualized approaches to learning strategies essential for success in nursing education and practice.

NRSG 299. Directed Study. 1-8 Units.

Opportunity for clinical learning in a selected area of nursing.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and the associate dean.

NRSG 305. Nursing Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Overview of the major drug classifications. Introduces the therapeutic use of drugs in the maintenance and strengthening of the client system lines of resistance and defense.

NRSG 308. Adult Health Nursing I. 8 Units.

Emphasizes the wholistic nature of the adult/aging client system in response to acute, short-term stressors. Uses the nursing process to assist the client system in achieving optimal wellness through strengthening lines of resistance and defense. Supervised practice in caring for the adult-client system in acute-care settings.
Prerequisite: NRSG 214, NRSG 216, NRSG 224.

NRSG 309. Gerontological Nursing. 4 Units.

Focuses on older adult client systems experiencing normal aging. Examines age-related stressors to client variables—physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual. Guided learning experiences in nursing care of the older client in long-term care and community settings.
Prerequisite: NRSG 214, NRSG 216.

NRSG 314. Obstetrical and Neonatal Nursing. 6 Units.

Emphasizes primary prevention strategies that promote optimal wellness for the mother and neonate, and identification of stressors that influence the family's normal lines of defense. Applies the nursing process, using a wholeness approach when caring for the maternal-fetal and maternal-infant dyads.
Prerequisite: NRSG 317.

NRSG 315. Child Health Nursing. 6 Units.

Focuses on the client from infancy through adolescence within the family system. Wholistic nursing care emphasizing optimal wellness in relation to potential or actual stressors, including primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions. Individualization of the nursing process guided by physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual variables of the client system.
Prerequisite: NRSG 317.

NRSG 316. The Nursing Role in Health Promotion. 4 Units.

Prepares the student to promote optimal wellness throughout the lifespan. Examines the impact of common lifespan stressors on students, clients, and family systems. Primary preventions--including theories of behavior change, motivation, and health education--applied to strengthen lines of defense.
Prerequisite: NRSG 308.

NRSG 317. Adult Health Nursing II. 8 Units.

Continues NRSG 308. Explores relationships among adult and aging client/family system variables in the development of primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions for chronic stressors that require comprehensive nursing care. Guided practice in acquiring advanced nursing skills and clinical integration.
Prerequisite or concurrent*: NRSG 308, NRSG 217*, NRSG 309.

NRSG 324. Nursing Informatics and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Units.

Applies information technology systems to evidence-based practice, education, and communication in health-care settings. Reviews academic and research-based publications and writing formats. Addresses quality of care, patient safety, and ethical issues. An IP notation assigned pending successful completion of LLEAP requirements.

NRSG 337. Strategies for Professional Transition. 4 Units.

Focuses on growth and enhancement of the professional nurse. Includes the following topics: (1) professional nursing in a changing health-care delivery system, (2) exploration of identified nursing role issues, (3) legal and ethical foundations of professional nursing, (4) socialization to professional nursing roles, and (5) theoretical foundations of professional nursing. Emphasizes scholarship for evidence-based practice. Based on learning objectives for career growth, students assess and strengthen the application of skills in communication, research, professional responsibility and values, teaching and learning process, management, nursing process, and individual empowerment for themselves, clients, and communities. Includes orientation to LLU campus/University setting, assessment and development of learning objectives, and portfolio development.

NRSG 338. Essential Leadership Concepts for Nursing Licensure. 1 Unit.

Management issues related to entry into nursing practice. For students who have a previous B.S./B.A. degree or LVN taking the 45 unit option and who wish to sit for boards at the end of the junior year. Course does not apply towards the bachelor's degree.

NRSG 375. Introduction to Applied Biostatistics for Nurses. 3 Units.

Introduces statistical methods of summarizing, analyzing, presenting, and interpreting data, with emphasis on nursing research. Topics include normal and binomial distributions, probability, central limit theorem, confidence intervals; as well as hypothesis testing using t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, linear regression, and chi-square. Includes a brief introduction to multivariate analysis. Practice in reading and interpreting statistical summaries in peer-reviewed literature. Emphasizes the practical application of biostatistics.
Prerequisite: Competency in introductory level mathematics.

NRSG 375L. Computer Applications in Biostatistics. 1 Unit.

Uses SPSS to apply appropriate statistical methods in the summary and analysis of health-related data, including descriptive; as well as hypothesis testing using t-tests, correlation, linear regression, chi-square, and ANOVA. Designed to be taken concurrently with STAT 414.

NRSG 399. Nursing Externship. 1 Unit.

An elective work-study course that provides opportunity for experiential understanding of the nature of nursing in the work place. Focuses on application of the Neuman framework. The student, under the supervision of an RN preceptor, applies previously learned skill in providing direct patient care.
Prerequisite: NRSG 408.

NRSG 404. Introduction to Epidemiology for Nursing. 3 Units.

Explores historic and current epidemiological investigation methods, evaluates health-care study designs, and analyzes utilization of evidence-based nursing practices impacting delivery of care on personal, organizational, community, national, and global levels. In-depth exploration of interdisciplinary communication, collaboration, and development of nursing interventions impacting disease identification, control, and management. Comprehensive focus on assessment and measurement of disease occurrence, frequency and prevention of illness, infection control practices, and evaluation of evidence-based research impacting nursing care.
Prerequisite: Completion of statistics course.

NRSG 407. Complex Nursing Concepts of Health and Disease. 6 Units.

Explores the complex pathophysiological concepts across the lifespan using a systems approach. Applies multifaceted alterations at the cell/system levels and potential resulting functional changes to the nursing practice. Presents comprehensive clinical case studies based on theory to support nursing assessments and interventions. Uses theories relating etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations to investigate and understand the common disease processes. Builds upon the underlying concepts of previous anatomy and physiology courses. Through online discussion and simulation-based practice, teaches evidence-based advanced health assessment theory and its application across the lifespan.
Prerequisite: NRSG 337.

NRSG 408. Critical Care Nursing. 6 Units.

Students study and participate in complex clinical nursing practice (critical care). Students utilize the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention with critically ill clients and their families. Emphasizes the scientific basis of the effects of stressors on the lines of defense and resistance. Promotes collaborative efforts of the members of the health-care team in the care of the critically ill client and his/her family.
Prerequisite: NRSG 314, NRSG 315, NRSG 316, NRSG 317.

NRSG 409. Home Health Nursing. 3 Units.

Wholistic care of the client system across the lifespan within the home. Clinical experience focuses on acute and chronic stressors. Introduces community resources to facilitate continuity of care and to promote optimal wellness.
Prerequisite: NRSG 314, NRSG 315, NRSG 316, NRSG 317.

NRSG 414. Management and Leadership for the Working Nurse. 5 Units.

The health care agency or nursing unit viewed as the core system, with lines of defense and lines of resistance. The management process as the set of interventions aimed at maintaining or restoring a state of equilibrium and order within the organization. The role of the first-line manager observed and some aspects experienced.

NRSG 415. Community Mental Health Nursing. 4 Units.

Student delivers psychiatric nursing care in a variety of clinical settings within the community. Guidance given in assessing stressors and developing primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions within populations at risk for psychosocial stress. Student practices case management strategies and psychoeducational interventions. Clinical experience directed toward optimizing lines of defense and resistance for families, groups, and communities.
Prerequisite: Completion of 200- and 300-level NRSG courses.

NRSG 416. Public Health Nursing. 4 Units.

Focuses on the optimal wellness of the client community in partnership with the community health nurse. Intervention strategies emphasize primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention with micro- and macroclient systems. Develops skills in assessment; diagnosis; planning based on outcomes; and implementation within inter-, extra-, and intrasystem of the client community.
Prerequisite: NRSG 404, NRSG 408, NRSG 409.

NRSG 416L. Public Health Nursing Clinical Laboratory. 4 Units.

Clinical application focusing on the optimal wellness of the community as client. Intervention strategies emphasizing primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention with micro-/macro-client systems.
Prerequisite or concurrent*: NRSG 404, NRSG 416*.

NRSG 418. Capstone Nursing Practicum. 8 Units.

Application of theoretical knowledge and skills in a preceptored clinical experience. Integrates selected management principles into clinical practice.
Prerequisite: NRSG 415, NRSG 429.

NRSG 419. Capstone: Management and Leadership in Nursing. 5 Units.

Provides historical overview of theories of leadership and management leading to the development of leadership skills. Explores current concepts of issues in the field of nursing.

NRSG 420. Professional Preparation. 2 Units.

Preparation for the NCLEX-RN examination, with emphasis on career development and licensure issues.

NRSG 424. Professional Practice for the Working RN. 7 Units.

Provides an online opportunity for synthesis and application of theoretical knowledge and skills to a clinical practice environment. Enhances critical thinking and clinical decision making in the clinical practice area through current clinical readings and online studies, discussions, interprofessional simulation, and identification and exploration of ethical and clinical issues. Documents baccalaureate outcomes in a professional portfolio.
Prerequisite: NRSG 337, NRSG 407.

NRSG 426. Public Health Nursing for Working RNs. 4 Units.

Focuses on the optimal wellness of the community as client. Intervention strategies emphasizing primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention with micro-/macroclient systems. Develops skills in assessment; diagnosis; planning based on outcomes; and implementation within inter-, extra-, and intrasystem of both aggregate and geopolitical clients. Assignments designed to focus on the working environment of the RN. Credit cannot be earned for NRSG 416 and NRSG 426.
Prerequisite: NRSG 337, NRSG 404, NRSG 407.

NRSG 426L. Public Health Nursing Clinical Laboratory for the Working RN. 4 Units.

Clinical application focusing on the optimal wellness of the community as client. Intervention strategies emphasizing primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention with micro-/macro-client systems. Assignments designed to focus on the working environment of the RN. Credit cannot be earned for both NRSG 416L and NRSG 426L.
Prerequisite or concurrent: NRSG 426.

NRSG 429. Nursing Research. 3 Units.

Prepares the novice nurse consumer to identify practice issues and appraise evidence related to the profession of nursing in order to more effectively integrate evidence into learning, understanding, and practice. Provides the knowledge and understanding of qualitative and quantitative systems of inquiry necessary for the novice nurse to facilitate optimal wellness through retention, attainment, and maintenance of client system stability.
Prerequisite: Complete all NRSG 300 level courses.

NRSG 497. Advanced Clinical Experience. 3-12 Units.

An elective course open to students seeking clinical experience in nursing.

NRSG 499. Directed Study. 1-8 Units.

Opportunity for clinical experience in a selected area of nursing.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and the associate dean.

NRSG 514. Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology for the Nurse Anesthetist II. 4 Units.

Study of the causes, processes, and clinical manifestations of disease and the associated anesthesia management of patients with specific disorders.
Prerequisite: NRSG 567; ANAT 527; PHSL 506.

NRSG 518. Orientation to Clinical Practice. 1 Unit.

Orientation to the clinical setting through supervised experiences in the management of patients throughout the perianesthetic continuum. Focuses on preparation of the anesthetizing location and successful creation and implementation of an anesthetic plan of care. Emphasizes patient safety and prevention of iatrogenic complications. Requires participation in weekly grand rounds.

NRSG 519. Advanced Role Development for the Nurse Anesthetist. 4 Units.

Examines advanced practice registered nurse roles and core competencies. Focuses on issues relevant to nurse anesthesia practice, including history of nurse anesthesia, role of the nurse anesthetist in California, and an overview of ethical medical-legal issues. Emphasizes collaborative communication and the nurse anesthetist as educator. Per week: theory three hours, practicum zero hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 520, NRSG 521.

NRSG 520. Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice I. 4 Units.

Examines basic principles of anesthesia related to the perianesthetic management of patients undergoing surgical, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 1 hour.

NRSG 521. Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice II. 4 Units.

Builds upon basic principles of anesthesia, and introduces advanced concepts in the individualized perianesthetic management of patients with a variety of coexisting diseases and disorders who are undergoing diverse procedures. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 1 hour.
Prerequisite: NRSG 520.

NRSG 522. Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice III. 5 Units.

Applies basic and advanced principles of anesthesia to the individualized perianesthetic management of patients with various coexisting diseases and disorders across the life span. Per week: theory 4 hours, practicum 1 hour.
Prerequisite: NRSG 521.

NRSG 523. Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice IV. 4 Units.

Focuses on the perianesthetic management of patients impacted by increasingly complex coexisting diseases and/or procedures. Includes an examination of various regional anesthesia techniques and associated considerations. Per week: theory 3 hours, practicum 3 hour.
Prerequisite: NRSG 522.

NRSG 524. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference I. 3 Units.

Supervised experience in the management of patients throughout the perianesthetic continuum. Focuses on preparation of the anesthetizing area and successful creation and implementation of an anesthetic plan of care. Emphasizes patient safety and prevention of iatrogenic complications. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 2 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 522.

NRSG 525. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference II. 4 Units.

Continued supervised experience in the management of patients throughout the perianesthetic continuum, focusing on identification and intervention of physiological responses to anesthesia and surgery. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 524.

NRSG 526. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference III. 4 Units.

Continued supervised experience in the full scope of anesthesia practice, focusing on predicting and preventing anesthetic management issues in cases with increasing complexity. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 525.

NRSG 527. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference IV. 4 Units.

Continued supervised experience in the full scope of anesthesia practice. Emphasizes exposure to advanced anesthetic and surgical techniques. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory 1 hour, practicum 3 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 526.

NRSG 528. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference V. 4 Units.

Continued unrestricted experience in advanced anesthetic techniques and surgical specialties. Includes orientation and instruction of junior students enrolled in Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference I. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory one hour, practicum three hours. Prerequisites: NRSG 527.

NRSG 529. Clinical Practicum and Correlation Conference VI. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of anesthetic care plans using all major techniques for all surgical specialties, with increasing independence based on individual skill levels. Provides opportunities for refinement of decision-making skills in preparation for the independent management of anesthetics. Clinical correlation conference participation includes attendance at required grand rounds and conferences, participation in class discussions and projects, and review of selected anesthetic concepts and techniques. Per week: theory one hour, practicum three hours. Prrerequisite: NRSG 528.

NRSG 548. Nursing Administration Practicum. 1-10 Units.

Provides opportunities for the ongoing development and refinement of leadership capability in selected areas of nursing administration. Students showcase competencies in the synthesis and application of nursing, management, economic, and human resources theories to solve real-world issues of importance to the profession and the workplace. Per week: lecture 0 hours, practicum 3-24 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 547; HADM 528.

NRSG 551. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Focuses on the PNP primary care role in health promotion, wholistic assessment, and management of minor common illnesses for children from newborn through adolescence. Per week: theory three hours, practicum three hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 555, NRSG 556, NRSG 651, PHSL 588.

NRSG 552. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner II. 7 Units.

Continues development of the PNP primary care role for children from newborn through adolescence, related to assessment and management of common or acute illnesses while incorporating health maintenance and prevention. Per week: theory 3 hours, skills laboratory 3 hours, practicum 9 hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 551.

NRSG 553. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner III. 7 Units.

Continues development of the PNP primary care role in assessment and management of chronic or complex illnesses for children birth through adolescence. Per week: theory three hours, practicum twelve hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 552.

NRSG 554. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner IV. 7 Units.

Continues development of the PNP primary care role in assessment and management of chronic or complex illnesses for children birth through adolescence. Per week: theory two hours, practicum fifteen hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 553.

NRSG 557. Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner V. 5 Units.

Focuses on integration and synthesis of knowledge and skills, under the guidance of an expert preceptor, with the goal of working independently and collaboratively within a health-care team. Per week: theory zero hours, practicum fifteen hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 554.

NRSG 561. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Introduces the role, professional responsibilities, and clinical practice of the primary care adult-gerontology nurse practitioner (A-GNP). Focuses on primary health-care concepts related to health maintenance and promotion of optimal wellness and to common illnesses of the adult. Per week: lecture two hours, practicum six hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 555, NRSG 556, NRSG 651; PHSL 588.

NRSG 562. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Focuses on the A-GNP role of health promotion and management of common acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum nine hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 561; NRSG 566.

NRSG 563. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner III. 6 Units.

Continues focus on the A-GNP role of health promotion and management of patients with acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum nine hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 562.

NRSG 564. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner IV. 7 Units.

Focuses on health maintenance and management of patients with complex acute and chronic conditions across the adult life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum twelve hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 563.

NRSG 565. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner V. 6 Units.

Final clinical practicum. Emphasis on integrating prior learning and increasing clinical competence in primary care settings. Includes case study discussions and on-line certification practice testing. Per week: lecture zero hours, practicum eighteen hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 564.

NRSG 567. Scientific Foundations of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 2 Units.

In-depth study of the principles of mathematics, chemistry, and physics as they relate to nurse anesthesia practice.

NRSG 569. Primary Care Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner: Fragile Elders. 4 Units.

Continues development of the A-GNP role of health promotion, maintenance, and management—with focus on fragile elders with acute and chronic conditions. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum three hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 561.

NRSG 571. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia I. 6 Units.

First of three distance education technology-based courses focused on development of knowledge and application of pharmacology to nurse anesthesia clinical practice. Includes principles of drug action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, inhalation anesthetics, intravenous adjuncts, and opiates. Per week: theory six hours, practicum zero hours.

NRSG 572. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia II. 3 Units.

Second of three distance education technology-based courses focused on development of knowledge and application of pharmacology to nurse anesthesia clinical practice. Includes muscle relaxants, and an introduction to autonomic nervous system pharmacology. Per week: theory three hours, practicum zero hours.

NRSG 573. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia III. 2 Units.

Third of three distance education technology-based courses focused on development of knowledge and application of pharmacology to nurse anesthesia clinical practice.. Includes autonomic nervous system pharmacology, anti-arrhythmic medications, and medications for pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Per week: theory two hours, practicum zero hours.

NRSG 618A. Writing for Publication. 1 Unit.

First of a two-course mentored writing experience that includes information, resources, and guidance that facilitate development of a publishable manuscript.

NRSG 618B. Writing for Publication. 2 Units.

Second of a two-course mentored writing experience that includes information, resources, and guidance that facilitate development of a publishable manuscript.

NRSG 627. DNP Project Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

Using the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care, systematically develops over seven quarters the approach for implementation of an evidence-based practice project. Includes identification of the EBP question, the search for evidence, and steps for effective translation of the project into the specific practice setting.

NRSG 634A. DNP Project. 3 Units.

The first of four courses in development of the DNP project. Focuses on identifying and describing in detail the project problem, forming the project guidance committee and project team in the practice setting, and beginning development of the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation. An IP assigned at the end of each quarter until all steps are completed.

NRSG 634B. DNP Project. 3 Units.

The second of four courses in the development of the DNP project. Student comprehensively reviews and critiques relevant literature, works through the IRB approval process, pilots the project in the practice setting, and continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation. An IP assigned at the end of each quarter until all steps are completed.

NRSG 634C. DNP Project. 3 Units.

The third of four courses in the development of the DNP project. Student implements the change project using appropriate communication strategies with key personnel, adapts change strategies appropriately, and continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation. An IP assigned at the end of each quarter until all steps are completed.

NRSG 634D. DNP Project. 3 Units.

The last of four courses in the development of the DNP project. Student monitors and analyzes the change project, evaluates key variables, implements adjustments as needed, identifies implications for future work, continues developing the DNP project paper and PowerPoint presentation, and develops results for dissemination through publication and presentation. An IP assigned at the end of each quarter until all steps are completed.

NRSG 650. Family Nurse Practitioner: Children and Adolescents. 4 Units.

Focuses on the FNP role of health promotion and management of common conditions in infants, children, and adolescents. Emphasizes normal growth and development and principles of anticipatory guidance. Per week: theory 3 hours, clinical 3 hours.

NRSG 652. Family Nurse Practitioner I. 4 Units.

Introduces the role, professional responsibilities, and clinical practice of the family nurse practitioner (FNP). Focuses on primary health-care concepts related to health promotion, maintenance, and common illnesses across the life span. Per week: theory two hours, practicum six hours. Prerequisite NRSG 555, NRSG 556; NRSG 651; PHSL 588.

NRSG 653. Family Nurse Practitioner II. 6 Units.

Focuses on the FNP role of health promotion and management of common acute and chronic conditions across the life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum nine hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 652.

NRSG 654. Family Nurse Practitioner III. 7 Units.

Continues focus on the FNP role of health promotion and management of patients with acute and chronic conditions across the life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum twelve hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 653.

NRSG 655. Family Nurse Practitioner IV. 7 Units.

Focuses on health promotion, maintenance and management of patients with complex acute and chronic conditions across the life span. Per week: lecture three hours, practicum twelve hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 654.

NRSG 656. Family Nurse Practitioner V. 7 Units.

Final clinical practicum. Emphasis on integrating prior learning and increasing clinical competence in primary care settings. Includes case study discussions and on-line certification practice testing. Per week: lecture zero hours, practicum twenty-one hours.
Prerequisite: NRSG 655.