Counseling — M.S.

Interim program director
Randall Walker

The M.S. degree program in counseling is located in the Department of Counseling and Family Sciences within the School of Behavioral Health. Candidates prepare to become licensed professional clinical counselors (LPCC). Students may also elect to prepare to become pupil personnel services (PPS) credentialed school counselors. Those wishing to complete the school counseling certificate program must apply separately before the end of the first quarter of their graduate degree program. See the school counseling certificate program for further details.

The curriculum is designed to give students a broad academic background in mental health counseling and with supervised field experience. Degree requirements include completion of 90 quarter units of academic coursework and field experience, as stipulated in the curriculum. Clinical placements range from working as a trainee in University clinics—such as the Behavioral Medicine Center, to off-campus sites of various types. 

Graduates who complete Loma Linda University’s M.S. degree in counseling meet all educational requirements to treat individuals, families, and groups. 

Students may also complete the certificate in drug and alcohol counseling by adding a minimum number of units to their program of study. Those interested must apply separately to this certificate program. 

Licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) 

Professional clinical counseling (LPCC) is a broad-based mental health profession throughout the United States that qualifies LPCCs for work in a variety of settings. Loma Linda University graduates of the M.S. degree in counseling program are educationally qualified to treat individuals, families, and groups of all ages. They are also prepared to address education and career counseling issues as well as work with families of children with special needs. When licensed, they may choose to set up private practices or work in mental health clinics, substance-use treatment facilities, inpatient and outpatient medical facilities, religious organizations, family court, employee assistance programs, retirement homes, higher education, and K-12 schools as mental health counselors.

The California Business and Professions Code Section 4999.20 defines professional clinical counseling as “the application of counseling interventions and psychotherapeutic techniques to identify and remediate cognitive, mental, and emotional issues—including personal growth, adjustment to disability, crisis intervention, and psychosocial and environmental problems. Professional clinical counseling includes conducting assessment for the purpose of establishing counseling goals and objectives to empower individuals to deal adequately with life situations, reduce stress, experience growth, change behavior, and make well-informed rational decisions.” 

The California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) regulates all master’s-level licenses in mental health. State standards for LPCC are consistent with national standards, making it easier for graduates to be granted reciprocity throughout the country. Equivalent licensure in other states may be referred to as licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical mental health counselor (LCMHC), or similar titles. Complete information regarding the scope of license for LPCC is located on the Board of Behavioral Sciences website <http://bbs.ca.gov/pdf/forms/lpc/lpc_scope_practice.pdf>.

LPCC clinical training and field experience

All LPCC candidates must complete field experiences as advised throughout their programs. LPCC completion requires 300 clock hours of clinical training in counseling clients. Additional details related to hours and supervision will be available upon admission.  

Counseling and Family Sciences Clinic

The Loma Linda University Counseling and Family Sciences (CFS) Clinic is operated by the Department of Counseling and Family Sciences. Counseling students may be placed in the CFS Clinic during their time in the program.

Additional certification options

Candidates may choose to become certified in pupil personnel services (PPS) or drug and alcohol counseling. Both certificate programs require additional applications. See specific program for details. 

Program learning outcomes

Graduates of the M.S. degree program in counseling will be able to:

  1. Develop an identity as a professional counselor;
  2. Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of the ethical standards of professional counseling organizations and credentialing bodies, and the ability to apply ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling;
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for identifying and eliminating barriers, prejudices, and processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination in clinical work;
  4. Demonstrate ethical and culturally relevant strategies for promoting resilience as well as optimum development and wellness across the life span;
  5. Identify strategies for facilitating client skill development for career, educational, and life-work planning and management;
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of and competency in a variety of evidence-based prevention and intervention counseling strategies and techniques;
  7. Develop knowledge of group therapy, an understanding of group dynamics, and competency in designing, forming, and facilitating groups;
  8. Demonstrate ethical and culturally relevant strategies for selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and test results.

Financial assistance

For information regarding funding opportunities, see Student Aid in the financial polices section of this CATALOG.

The Counseling M.S. is accredited through the University by the Accrediting Commission for Schools Western Association of Schools and Colleges (ACS WASC). The Counseling M.S. program has been evaluated and approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to meet Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) licensure requirements, pursuant to California Business and Professions Code (BPC) §4999.33.  The Pupil Personnel Services Credential Program (PPS) in School Counseling is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) which regulates and issues credentials.

Loma Linda University is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), 985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501; telephone: 510/748-9001; fax: 510/748-9797; website:  <http://www.wscuc.org/contact>.

Applicants must meet Loma Linda University and School of Behavioral Health admissions requirements; and give evidence of academic ability, professional comportment, and mature judgment. Applicants, who meet these requirements, as well as the published deadlines for the following terms, may be admitted during Fall, Winter, Spring, or Summer Quarters. Additional admission requirements include:

  • Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • Minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in bachelor's coursework for at least the final 45 units prior to graduation.
    • Special consideration may be given to applicants with grade point averages as low as 2.75 if the last part of their college work shows significant improvement.
    • Applicants whose cumulative grade point averages do not meet minimum requirements may receive further consideration for admission by demonstrating background experience(s) that provides evidence that the applicant has the potential to successfully complete the program. The applicant must verify work or volunteer experience that demonstrates commitment to working as a professional counselor.
  • Ability to clearly communicate career objectives, personal interest in the counseling profession, rationale for choosing to attend Loma Linda University, how life experiences have influenced applicant's choice to enter the field, and additional thoughts the applicant deems important.
  • Interview with department faculty; as scheduled either on-campus; other interviews (by phone or online using Zoom) are scheduled individually for applicants who are unable to attend in-person interviews.

The applicant should view instructions for completing the application for registration as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) associate on the California Board of Behavioral Sciences website to understand the California requirements for licensure. Applicants with significant legal histories should contact the program director before applying to the program.

Pre-entrance requirements:

  • A background check
  • Health clearance

The curriculum for the M.S. degree in counseling is divided into two domains: Core courses and Practicum-Internship courses. Requirements for completing the 90-unit masters degree are met by registering for eight (8) units of electives. The Counseling and Family Sciences department offers two certificates - School Counseling and Drug and Alcohol Counseling. Students may utilize elective units to easily integrate either of these certificates into their MS Counseling program. All electives must be advisor approved. 

Students must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (or a letter grade of B) in order to progress successfully through the program and complete the degree. In addition, students must meet the knowledge, skills, and professional performance competencies outlined by the program.

All course grades should meet the minimum B (3.0) standard, which by university policy indicates satisfactory performance. Courses in which a student earns a grade below a B (3.0) may need to be repeated (or may not apply to the degree) if competency in the subject area is related to practice performance with clients, and a grade less than a 3.0 represents marginal or unsatisfactory practice performance.

Core Courses
COUN 501Research Tools and Methodology: Quantitative3
COUN 502Research Tools and Methodology: Qualitative3
COUN 515Crisis Intervention and Client Advocacy3
COUN 524Psychopharmacology and Medical Issues3
COUN 528Culture, Socioeconomic Status in Therapy3
COUN 540Professional Counseling Orientation3
COUN 547Social Ecology of Individual and Family Development3
COUN 556Psychopathology and Diagnostic Procedures3
COUN 568Groups: Process and Practice3
COUN 575Counseling Theory and Applications3
COUN 576Exceptional and Medically Challenged Children3
COUN 577Assessment in Counseling3
COUN 579Career Theories and Applications4
COUN 580Advanced Counseling Theory and Techniques4
COUN 584Advanced Child and Adolescent Development3
COUN 604Social Context in Clinical Practice: Gender, Class, and Race3
COUN 614Law and Ethics3
COUN 624Individual and Systems Assessment3
COUN 638Substance Use Disorders, Relationships, and Recovery3
COUN 644Child Abuse and Family Violence3
COUN 674Human Sexual Behavior3
COUN 675Dynamics of Aging1
COUN 678Consultation and Program Evaluation3
Practicum-Internship Courses
COUN 541Clinical Practicum Seminar – Early Counselor Development2
COUN 542Clinical Internship Seminar – Spirituality2
COUN 543Clinical Internship Seminar – Multicultural and Cross-Cultural Interactions2
COUN 544Clinical Internship Seminar – Recovery-Oriented Care2
COUN 546Clinical Internship Seminar – Substance Use Disorder Treatment2
Religion Requirement
RELR 540Wholeness and Health 23
Electives 18
Total Units90

Degree requirements

  • A minimum of 90 quarter academic credits of graduate work, which includes credit received for core courses, elective courses, and a three-unit religion course.

Noncourse requirements

  • Residence of at least two academic years.
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 with no course grade lower than B.
  • University-required background check, TB test, annual flu vaccination and health clearance.
  • Successful completion of a written comprehensive examination (taken before advancement to candidacy) and a final oral comprehensive examination (or equivalent) at the end of the program.

Normal time to complete the program

Two [2] years (seven [7] academic quarters) — based on full-time enrollment; part time enrollments are permitted.

Courses

COUN 501. Research Tools and Methodology: Quantitative. 3 Units.

Current social research methods, practice in the use of techniques, consideration of the philosophy of the scientific method, and familiarization with behavioral health test instruments.
Cross-listing: MFAM 501.

COUN 502. Research Tools and Methodology: Qualitative. 3 Units.

Qualitative methodology. Prepares students to undertake research projects using the intensive interview method of qualitative research. Explores practical and epistemological issues and problems in qualitative research in a workshop format.
Cross-listing: MFAM 502.

COUN 515. Crisis Intervention and Client Advocacy. 3 Units.

Presents basic counseling theory, techniques, crisis intervention, and client-centered advocacy in recovery-oriented practice environments. Includes confidentiality, interprofessional cooperation, working with consumers, professional socialization, and collaboration. Discusses suicide, substance abuse, domestic violence, incest, spousal abuse, rape, treating the severely mentally ill, and disaster and trauma response.
Cross-listing: MFAM 515.

COUN 524. Psychopharmacology and Medical Issues. 3 Units.

Introduces common physical and medical issues related to the practice of counseling. Students learn a biopsychosocial-spiritual model to assess and intervene—emphasizing psychopharmacology, neuroanatomy, the mind-body relationship, and research relative to the field of counseling.

COUN 528. Culture, Socioeconomic Status in Therapy. 3 Units.

Addresses current information and historical narratives related to cultural diversity that impact belief systems, communication patterns, roles, and expectations within human relationships and systems. Examines SES and a wide range of social, racial, and ethnic factors that create meanings for individuals, couples, families, and mental health counselors. Emphasizes populations that become professional partners or clients served within this geographic region.
Cross-listing: MFAM 528.

COUN 540. Professional Counseling Orientation. 3 Units.

Examines history and scope of counseling specialties, principles of collaboration among diverse mental health professionals, factors influencing counseling process, and basic counseling skills. Addresses social ecology impacting consumers and providers within health care. Opens ongoing process of nurturing personal qualities related to counseling practice.

COUN 541. Clinical Practicum Seminar – Early Counselor Development. 2 Units.

Addresses professional development and the practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, mentoring, and group supervision. Focuses on early counselor skill development including rapport-building and active listening. S. program.
Prerequisite or concurrent*: COUN 540*; and admission into counseling M.

COUN 542. Clinical Internship Seminar – Spirituality. 2 Units.

Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, mentoring, and group supervision. Focuses on practical skill development in the area of spirituality and the incorporation of spirituality in counselor-recipient interactions. Assumes concurrent participation in clinical placement. S. program.
Prerequisite: COUN 540*, COUN 541; admission into counseling M.

COUN 543. Clinical Internship Seminar – Multicultural and Cross-Cultural Interactions. 2 Units.

Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, mentoring, and group supervision. Focuses on practical skill development in the area of multicultural and cross-cultural interactions. Assumes concurrent participation in clinical placement. S. program.
Prerequisite or concurrent*: COUN 540*; and admission into counseling M.

COUN 544. Clinical Internship Seminar – Recovery-Oriented Care. 2 Units.

Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, mentoring, and group supervision. Focuses on practical skill development in the area of recovery-oriented care. Assumes concurrent participation in clinical placement. S. program.
Prerequisite or concurrent*: COUN 540*, COUN 541; and admission to counseling M.

COUN 546. Clinical Internship Seminar – Substance Use Disorder Treatment. 2 Units.

Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, mentoring, and group supervision. Focuses on practical skill development in the area of comorbid diagnoses and substance abuse treatment. Assumes concurrent participation in clinical placement. S. program.
Prerequisite: COUN 541; admission into counseling M.

COUN 547. Social Ecology of Individual and Family Development. 3 Units.

Studies human individual development and its relationship to the family life cycle from birth through aging and death of family members. Discusses biological, psychological, social, and spiritual development in the context of family dynamics involving traditional two-parent families, alternative partnerships, single parents, blended families, and intergenerational communities.
Cross-listing: MFAM 547.

COUN 550. Clinical Interventions with Service Members, Veterans, and Families. 2 Units.

Provides multi-disciplinary understanding of military culture and skills and application of evidence-based clinical treatments that foster resilience and provide relief to service members, veterans and their families. Attention to issues of diversity, ethics, and use of self are included throughout clinical case discussion. Clinical issues specific to this population are discussed along with individual, family, and community interventions.
Prerequisite: PSYC 721 or SOWK 757C.
Cross-listing: PSYC 550, SOWK 550.

COUN 556. Psychopathology and Diagnostic Procedures. 3 Units.

Explores the history and development of psychopathology and how it relates to current clinical practice in general and marriage and family therapy in particular. Utilizes the multiaxial classifications of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual as a practical basis for diagnostics.
Cross-listing: MFAM 556.

COUN 568. Groups: Process and Practice. 3 Units.

Surveys major theoretical approaches, including individual theories, marital groups, network, and family therapy groups. Group laboratory experience provided wherein students apply theory to practice and develop group leadership skills.
Cross-listing: MFAM 568.

COUN 574. Educational Psychology. 3 Units.

Explores educational psychology through application of development and learning theories to instruction, achievement motivation, self-esteem, classroom management, supportive and disruptive processes on school sites, campus standards, disciplinary practices, legal/ethical issues. Requires research of effective educational practices and related foundations.
Prerequisite: General psychology.

COUN 575. Counseling Theory and Applications. 3 Units.

Counseling theories and applications necessary for work as counselors, therapists, and other mental health professionals. Historical overview of all theories from psychoanalytic, Adlerian, existential, person-centered, Gestalt, behavior, cognitive behavior, reality, feminist, postmodern (solution-focused and narrative), family systems, and integrative perspectives. Meaningful integration of ethics, theory, and experience on personal and case-study levels.

COUN 576. Exceptional and Medically Challenged Children. 3 Units.

Studies the determinants, characteristics, problems, and adjustments of individuals who deviate markedly from the norm in their mental, physical, emotional, or social aptitudes, traits, and tendencies. Emphasizes education and career planning.

COUN 577. Assessment in Counseling. 3 Units.

Develops competencies and understandings for selecting, administering, and interpreting the major types of standardized tests and inventories used in psychology and education. Theoretical principles and issues presented with hands-on applications.

COUN 579. Career Theories and Applications. 4 Units.

Study of career theories such as Holland, Ginzberg, Super; as well as multiple approaches, including family and systemic influences on career choice. Application made to values, ethics, meaning, decision making, and individual differences in twenty-first century work places.

COUN 580. Advanced Counseling Theory and Techniques. 4 Units.

Focuses on the advanced application of counseling constructs, assessment and treatment planning, clinical interventions, and therapeutic techniques that foster effective therapeutic relationships.
Prerequisite: COUN 540, COUN 575.

COUN 584. Advanced Child and Adolescent Development. 2,3 Units.

Psychodynamics involved in child and adolescent problems with respect to the family relationship. Demonstrates a variety of counseling approaches to the treatment of children and adolescents, with emphasis on diverse settings (e.g., education, hospital, and agency).
Cross-listing: MFAM 584.

COUN 604. Social Context in Clinical Practice: Gender, Class, and Race. 3 Units.

Introduces social inequalities that result in unfairness, health disparities, assaults to personal dignity, and family stress. Focuses on how one's position within social hierarchies—such as gender, socioeconomic status, race, and sexual orientation—affects psychological and relational health. Examination of how family therapists and counselors address these social contextual factors as part of a recovery-based approach that empowers people within their relationships and social systems.
Cross-listing: MFAM 604.

COUN 614. Law and Ethics. 3 Units.

Examines child welfare, separation, and divorce law, and financial aspects of family maintenance. Includes case management, referrals, professional and client interactions, ethical and interprofessional relations, legal responsibilities, and confidentially. Explores interactions among the practitioner's sense of self and human values, professional behavior, scope of practice, and ethics. Examination of impacts of culture, SES, poverty, social stress, and biology on the recovery process.

COUN 624. Individual and Systems Assessment. 3 Units.

Applies psychological testing methods in the diagnostic assessment of individual, family, and group behavioral dynamics as encountered in behavioral health counseling.
Cross-listing: MFAM 624.

COUN 638. Substance Use Disorders, Relationships, and Recovery. 3 Units.

Examines current theories of etiology of substance use disorders and the effects of psychoactive drug use. Emphasizes assessment and evaluation strategies; impact on mental, biological, relational, and community systems; evidence-based prevention and treatment approaches within a recovery process orientation. Explores issues of regional multicultural competence, human diversity, and access to care.
Cross-listing: MFAM 638.

COUN 644. Child Abuse and Family Violence. 3 Units.

Presents characteristics of physical and emotional abuse, neglect, sexual molestation, and family violence including offender and nonoffender traits. Focus on treatment including individual, group, and family therapy. Ethical and legal issues, community resources, and multidisciplinary approaches to child abuse. Examines cultural, SES, poverty and/or social stress impacts on mental health and recovery.
Cross-listing: MFAM 644.

COUN 674. Human Sexual Behavior. 3 Units.

Sexuality in contemporary society from the sociopsychological viewpoint. Anatomy and physiology of human sexuality: reproduction, normal and abnormal sexual response, psychosexual development, human fertility, human sexual dysfunction. Integration of systems theory.
Cross-listing: MFAM 674.

COUN 675. Dynamics of Aging. 1 Unit.

Studies aging and related processes of personal and systemic change, such as developmental and self-actualization challenges, retirement, chronic illness, long term care, losses, and other end-of-life issues.

COUN 678. Consultation and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

Examines principles and practices of consultation and program evaluation within educational and clinical counseling environments. Emphasizes systemic concepts, leadership development, counselor advocacy, relational competence, team building, and professional accountability of personnel and programs.

COUN 679. Professional School Counseling. 3 Units.

Integrates knowledge and skills essential for development, implementation, coordination, and supervision of counseling programs within educational institutions—with emphasis on the role and function of school counselors in preschool, elementary, middle, and secondary grades. Applications made to state graduation requirements, case management, school law, community, consultation, and professional ethics.

COUN 680. Field Experience in Counseling. 3-9 Units.

Addresses educational assessment, personal and social counseling, academic and career counseling, program development, program coordination and supervision, consultation, legal aspects, and professional ethics in schools and other agencies. Meets State Pupil Personnel Services requirement of a minimum of 600 clock hours in two educational levels, public school activity, and involvement with students from diverse cultural, ethnic, and language backgrounds.

COUN 681. School Counseling Practicum and Seminar. 1 Unit.

Focuses on California standards for the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling. Addresses professional development and practice of school counseling. Enrollment restricted to students in the M.S. degree in Counseling Program and in the School Counseling Certificate Program. Requires minimum of two quarters of COUN 681 School Counseling and practicum. S. degree in Couneling Program and the School Counseling Certificate Program.
Prerequisite: Limited to students in the M.

COUN 682. Clinical Counseling Practicum and Seminar. 1 Unit.

Focuses on California standards for licensure as a licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC). Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, University mentoring, and group process. Enrollment restricted to students in M.S. degree in Counseling Program. Registration in COUN 682 required during every quarter of field experience in clinical counseling.

COUN 691. Process Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Explores advanced process approaches to theory and experiential work fundamental to self-awareness, relationship skills, behavioral observations, self-regulatory processes, emotion-focused therapy, and counselor-client contact with individuals and groups.

COUN 692. Cognitive Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Integrates advanced cognitive approaches with experiential work, including current practice of cognitive behavioral therapies such as DBT and TF-CBT. Includes live demonstrations of professional counseling, in-class role play, and laboratory experiences that utilize recording and evaluation of student practice sessions. Enrollment restricted to candidates in clinical degree programs.

COUN 693. Systemic Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Integrates theory and advanced approaches to counseling individuals and groups within various systems. Demonstrates evidenced-based psychoeducation programs, therapy structures, and mental health delivery methods, with emphasis on recovery care and trauma response models. Enrollment restricted to candidates in clinical degree programs.

COUN 694. Directed Study: Counseling. 1-4 Units.

Directed study in counseling.

COUN 781. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 782. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 783. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 784. School Counseling Field Experience. 3 Units.

Fourth course in a series of 3-unit registrations (COUN 781-786) for University-arranged field experience in school counseling. Requires that student document 100 hours of counseling practicum; obtain a certificate of clearance from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing; and subsequently complete 100 hours of supervised counseling in a public school, with on-site supervision by a PPS-credentialed school counselor. Enrollment restricted to students in the M.S. degree in Counseling Program and/or the School Counseling Certificate Program who are working toward the pupil personnel services credential (PPS) in school counseling.

COUN 791. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, and other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress notation (IP) until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 792. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, and other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an ongoing field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress notation (IP) until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 793. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, or other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).