Counseling — M.S.

Program director
Cheryl Simpson

The M.S. degree program in counseling is housed in the Department of Counseling and Family Sciences within the School of Behavioral Health.  Candidates have the option of preparing to become a licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) and/or a pupil personnel services (PPS) credentialed school counselor.  Most students complete both specializations.

The M.S. degree curriculum in counseling is designed to give students a broad academic background in mental health counseling, advanced course work in one or more selected counseling specializations, and supervised field experience.  Candidates must choose one (and may choose both) of the following specializations: licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) or pupil personnel services credential in school counseling (PPS).  Degree requirements include completion of 90 quarter units of academic course work and field experience, as stipulated in the curriculum for the chosen specialization(s).  Clinical placements range from working as a trainee in University clinics, such as the Behavioral Health Institute (BHI) and the Behavioral Medicine Center (BMC), to off-campus sites of various types.  School placements range from elementary, middle, and high school levels. 

Graduates who complete Loma Linda University’s M.S. degree in counseling and LPCC specialization meet all educational requirements to treat individuals, couples, families, and groups.  Graduates who complete the M.S. degree in counseling and PPS specialization meet all educational requirements for the school counseling credential. 

Licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) specialization

Professional clinical counseling (LPCC) is a broad-based mental health profession throughout the United States that qualifies LPCCs for work in a variety of settings.  Loma Linda University graduates of the M.S. degree in counseling program with LPCC specialization are educationally qualified to treat individuals, couples, families, and groups of all ages.  They are also uniquely prepared to address education and career counseling issues and to work with families of children with special needs.  When licensed, they may choose to set up a private practice or work in mental health clinics, substance abuse rehabilitation centers, in-patient and out-patient medical facilities, religious organizations, family court, employee assistance programs, retirement homes, higher education, and K-12 schools as mental health counselors.

The California Business and Professions Code Section 4999.20 defines professional clinical counseling as “the application of counseling interventions and psychotherapeutic techniques to identify and remediate cognitive, mental, and emotional issues—including personal growth, adjustment to disability, crisis intervention, and psychosocial and environmental problems. Professional clinical counseling includes conducting assessment for the purpose of establishing counseling goals and objectives to empower individuals to deal adequately with life situations, reduce stress, experience growth, change behavior, and make well-informed rational decisions.” 

The California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) regulates all master’s-level licenses in mental health. State standards for LPCC are consistent with national standards, making it easier for graduates to be granted reciprocity throughout the country. Equivalent licensure in other states may be titled licensed professional counselor (LPC), licensed clinical mental health counselor (LCMHC), or similar titles. Complete information regarding scope of license for LPCC is located on the Board of Behavioral Sciences Web site <http://bbs.ca.gov/pdf/forms/lpc/lpc_scope_practice.pdf>.

Pupil personnel services credential (PPS): school counseling specialization

School counselors serve as leaders of counseling programs within the educational system that address academic, career, and personal/social needs of students. They serve as counselors and advocates for students, collaborators with parents and school personnel, and liaisons to the community. As articulated by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), school counseling programs are preventive in design, developmental in nature, and integral to the total educational program. Combining the school counselor certification with clinical counselor licensure is an excellent professional path that enhances counseling competence and professional opportunities. Additional information about the pupil personnel services credential in school counseling is found at the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Internet address <http://www.ctc.ca.gov/>.

LPCC clinical training and PPS field experience

All LPCC and PPS school counseling candidates must complete field experience as advised throughout their program.  LPCC completion requires 450 clock hours of clinical training, of which 300 must be face-to-face counseling with clients.  PPS school counseling requires 600 clock hours of field experience, 400 of which must be completed in public schools at two different grade levels.  Additional details related to hours and supervision will be available upon admission.  

Counseling and Family Sciences Clinic

Loma Linda University Counseling and Family Sciences (CFS) Clinic is operated by the Department of Counseling and Family Sciences.  The clinic is located on the second floor of the Loma Linda University Behavioral Health Institute (BHI) as one of the participating academic clinics.  The BHI is an innovative endeavor undertaken by Loma Linda University to offer community members easy access to all behavioral health disciplines in one location for an integrated, interdisciplinary clinic staffed by students and residents from child life, clinical counseling, marital and family therapy, psychiatry, psychology, and social work.   

Additional certification options

In addition to the clinical and school counseling specializations embedded within the M.S. degree in counseling, candidates may choose to become certified in clinical mediation or drug and alcohol counseling.  

Learning outcomes

Students in the M.S. degree program in counseling will:

  1. Integrate counseling concepts and skills with a personal epistemology.
  2. Demonstrate counseling interventions based upon a broad range of theoretical and legal/ethical frameworks through comprehensive written examination.
  3. Develop identity as a professional counselor through membership and participation in professional organizations.
  4. Satisfactorily complete supervised practicum in counseling.
  5. Meet all University qualifications for the licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) credential and/or the pupil personnel services (PPS) credential in school counseling, which is issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC).

Financial assistance

For information regarding funding opportunities, see Student Aid in the financial polices section of this Catalog.

The Counseling M.S. is accredited through the University by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).  The Licensed Professional Clinical Counseling (LPCC) program is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) which regulates and issues licenses.  The Pupil Personnel Services Credential Program (PPS) in School Counseling is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) which regulates and issues credentials.

Loma Linda University is regionally accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), 985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501; telephone: 510/748-9001; fax: 510/748-9797; Web site: <http://www.wascsenior.org> or <http://www.wascsenior.org/contact>.

Applicants must meet Loma Linda University and School of Behavioral Health admissions requirements; and give evidence of academic ability, professional comportment, and mature judgment. Applicants, who meet these requirements, as well as the published deadlines for the following terms, may be admitted during Fall, Winter, Spring, or Summer quarters. Additional admission requirements include:

  • Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • Minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in bachelor's course work for at least the final 45 units prior to graduation.
  • Special consideration may be given to applicants with grade point averages as low as 2.75 if the last part of their college work shows significant improvement.
  • Applicants whose cumulative grade point average does not meet the minimum requirements stated above may receive further consideration for admission by demonstrating background experience(s) that provides evidence that the applicant has the potential to successfully complete the program.  The applicant might verify work or volunteer experience that demonstrates commitment to working in a counseling specialization.  
  • Official transcripts of all colleges and universities attended since high school.  
  • Three letters of recommendation as specified on the application.
  • Written personal statement that addresses career objectives, personal interest in the counseling profession, rationale for choosing to attend Loma Linda University, how life experiences have influenced applicant's choice to enter the field, and additional thoughts the applicant deems important.
  • If English is not the applicant’s first language, a minimum score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of 213 on the computer administration of the test; or a score of 550 for the pencil/paper administration.
  • If the applicant is not a citizen or permanent resident of the U.S., a valid student visa. 
  • Interview with department faculty, as scheduled (on-campus group interviews are scheduled for mid-March and mid-May; other on-campus and phone interviews are scheduled individually for applicants who are unable to attend the group interview).

The applicant should view “instruction for completing application for registration as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) intern and Pupil Personnel Service (PPS) Credentialed School Counselor to understand the California requirements for licensure and credentialing.  One should not apply to the program if s/he has any convictions or disciplinary actions cited by the organizations regulating licenses and credentials.

Pre-entrance requirements:

  • A background check
  • Health clearance

The curriculum for the M.S. degree in counseling offers the option of single or dual specialization in Licensed Professional Clinical Counseling (LPCC) and Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) Credential in School Counseling. Candidates must choose at least one specialization. The curriculum is divided into three domains, as outlined below: Core courses, specialization courses, and field experience courses related to selected specialization(s). Candidates choosing only one specialization may count courses from the other specialization as electives for their 90 academic credit requirement.  Other electives must be advisor-approved.

Core Courses Required for Both LPCC and PPS Specializations
COUN 501Research Tools and Methodology: Quantitative3.0
COUN 502Research Tools and Methodology: Qualitative3.0
COUN 515Crisis Intervention and Client Advocacy3.0
COUN 524Psychopharmacology and Medical Issues3.0
COUN 528Culture, Socioeconomic Status and Therapy3.0
COUN 540Foundations of Counseling and Psychotherapy3.0
COUN 547Social Ecology of Individual and Family Development3.0
COUN 556Psychopathology and Diagnostic Procedures3.0
COUN 568Groups: Process and Practice3.0
COUN 575Counseling Theory and Applications3.0
COUN 576Exceptional and Medically Challenged Children3.0
COUN 577Assessment in Counseling3.0
COUN 579Career Theories and Applications4.0
COUN 584Advanced Child and Adolescent Development3.0
COUN 604Social Context in Clinical Practice: Gender, Class, and Race3.0
COUN 614Law and Ethics3.0
COUN 624Individual and Systems Assessment3.0
COUN 638Family Therapy and Chemical Abuse3.0
COUN 644Child Abuse and Family Violence3.0
COUN 674Human Sexual Behavior3.0
COUN 675Dynamics of Aging1.0
COUN 678Consultation and Program Evaluation3.0
Religion Requirement for LPCC and PPS Specializations: Select one of the following:3.0
Religion, Marriage, and the Family
Care of the Dying and Bereaved
RELR 5__
Graduate-level Relational
Specialization Courses for Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC)23
Clinical Counseling Practicum and Seminar (must take at least five times)
Process Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy
Cognitive Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy
Systemic Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy
Electives (12 units) 1
Specialization Courses for Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) School Counselor
Educational Psychology
Professional School Counseling
School Counseling Practicum and Seminar (must take at least two times)
Electives (15 units) 1
Total Units91
Field experience for LPCC and PPS dual specialization
COUN 781School Counseling Field Experience (PPS)4
COUN 782School Counseling Field Experience (PPS)4
COUN 791Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
COUN 792Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
COUN 793Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
Total Units17
Field experience for LPCC single specialization
COUN 791Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
COUN 792Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
COUN 793Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC)3
Total Units9
Field Experience for PPS School Counseling Single Specialization
COUN 781School Counseling Field Experience (PPS)4
COUN 782School Counseling Field Experience (PPS)4
COUN 783School Counseling Field Experience (PPS)4
Total Units12
1

Advisor-approved electives may be chosen from relevant graduate courses in other programs, provided that the course is not restricted to students in that specific degree. A list of possible electives will be provided.

Degree requirements

  • A minimum of 90 quarter academic credits of graduate work, which includes credit received for core courses, elective courses, and a 3-unit religion course.

Non-course requirements

  • Residence of at least two academic years.
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 with no course grade lower than C.
  • Certificate of Clearance (COC) prerequisites:  documentation of registration for California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), Live Scan, and current negative TB test results.
  • Certificate of Clearance (COC) prior to school counseling field experience PPS
  • Dual Specialization: Registrations in COUN 791, 792, 793 and COUN 781, 782 and COUN 681x2 quarters and COUN 682x5 quarters are required.
  • LPCC Single Specialization: Registrations in COUN 791, 792, 793 and COUN 682x5 quarters are required.
  • PPS School Counselor Single Specialization: Registrations in COUN 781, 782, 783 and COUN 681x2 quarters are required.
  • Successful completion of a written comprehensive examination (taken before advancement to candidacy) and a final oral examination at the end of the program.
  • If taken for elective credit, foreign language courses numbered 400 or higher. 

Normal time to complete the program

2 years (7 academic quarters) based on full-time enrollment; part time permitted

Courses

COUN 501. Research Tools and Methodology: Quantitative. 3 Units.

Current social research methods; practice in the use of techniques. Considers the philosophy of the scientific method, and familiarizes with counseling test instruments.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics as an undergraduate research methods course.

COUN 502. Research Tools and Methodology: Qualitative. 3 Units.

Qualitative methodology. Prepares students to undertake research projects using the intensive interview method of qualitative research. Explores practical and epistemological issues and problems in qualitative research explored in a workshop format.

COUN 515. Crisis Intervention and Client Advocacy. 3 Units.

Examines theory, techniques, and practice of crisis intervention and client-centered advocacy, with emphasis on development of basic counseling skills and recovery-oriented methods of service delivery. Addresses professional development, socialization, and collaboration among mental health providers. Utilizes multiple presenters from community agencies and recordings of crisis counseling work. Explores crises such as substance abuse, domestic violence, incest, spousal abuse, rape, treating the severely mentally ill, trauma, and disaster. Includes small-group laboratory experiences for practice of crisis counseling skills. Cross-listing: MFAM 515.

COUN 524. Psychopharmacology and Medical Issues. 3 Units.

Introduces common physical and medical issues related to the practice of counseling. Students learn a biopsychosocial-spiritual model to assess and intervene—emphasizing psychopharmacology, neuroanatomy, the mind-body relationship, and research relative to the field of counseling.

COUN 528. Culture, Socioeconomic Status and Therapy. 3 Units.

Addresses current information and historical narratives related to cultural diversity that impact belief systems, communication patterns, roles, and expectations within human relationships and systems. Examines SES and a wide range of social, racial, and ethnic factors that create meanings for individuals, couples, families, and mental health counselors. Emphasizes populations that become professional partners or clients served within this geographic region. Cross-listing MFAM 528.

COUN 540. Foundations of Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Units.

Examines history and scope of counseling specialties, principles of collaboration among diverse mental health professionals, factors influencing counseling process, and basic counseling skills. Addresses social ecology impacting consumers and providers within health care. Opens ongoing process of nurturing personal qualities related to counseling practice through deconstruction of personal biases; articulation of personal epistemologies; and development of autobiography, including spiritual formation. Course includes laboratory experience for practice of fundamental counseling skills, with live demonstrations and in-class role play.

COUN 545. Gender Perspectives. 2 Units.

Explores the identities, roles, and relationships of women and men in light of social, cultural, and historical perspectives. Implications for family therapists, educators, and other professionals explored.

COUN 547. Social Ecology of Individual and Family Development. 3 Units.

Studies human individual development and its relationship to the family life cycle from birth through aging and death of family members. Discusses biological, psychological, educational, social, and spiritual development in the context of family, education, and career dynamics involving traditional two-parent families, alternative partnerships, single parents, blended families, and intergenerational communities.

COUN 556. Psychopathology and Diagnostic Procedures. 3 Units.

Explores the history and development of psychopathology and how it relates to current clinical practice in general and marriage and family therapy in particular. Addresses classifications such as ADD/ADHD that affect school achievement and educational placement. Utilizes the multiaxial classifications of the DSM-IV as a practical basis for diagnostics.
Prerequisite: A course in abnormal psychology.

COUN 568. Groups: Process and Practice. 3 Units.

Surveys major theoretical approaches, including individual theories, marital groups, network, and family therapy groups. Group laboratory experience provided in which students apply theory to practice and develop group-leadership skills.

COUN 574. Educational Psychology. 3 Units.

Explores educational psychology through application of development and learning theories to instruction, achievement motivation, self-esteem, classroom management, supportive and disruptive processes on school sites, campus standards, disciplinary practices, legal/ethical issues. Requires research of effective educational practices and related foundations.
Prerequisite: General psychology.

COUN 575. Counseling Theory and Applications. 3 Units.

Counseling theories and applications necessary for work as counselors, therapists, and other mental health professionals. Historical overview of all theories from psychoanalytic, Adlerian, existential, person-centered, Gestalt, behavior, cognitive behavior, reality, feminist, postmodern (solution-focused and narrative), family systems, and integrative perspectives. Meaningful integration of ethics, theory, and experience on personal and case-study levels.

COUN 576. Exceptional and Medically Challenged Children. 3 Units.

Studies the determinants, characteristics, problems, and adjustments of individuals who deviate markedly from the norm in their mental, physical, emotional, or social aptitudes, traits, and tendencies. Emphasizes education and career planning.

COUN 577. Assessment in Counseling. 3 Units.

Develops competencies and understandings for selecting, administering, and interpreting the major types of standardized tests and inventories used in psychology and education. Theoretical principles and issues presented with hands-on applications. Practicum required.

COUN 578. College and Career Counseling. 3 Units.

Examines vocational and career-choice theories, trends, and related educational programming, including introduction to interest, attitude, and ability evaluation used for career counseling. Includes administration, scoring, and interpretation as part of hands-on application in schools and clinic settings.

COUN 579. Career Theories and Applications. 4 Units.

Study of career theories such as Holland, Ginzberg, Super; as well as multiple approaches, including family and systemic influences on career choice. Application made to values, ethics, meaning, decision making, and individual differences in twenty-first century work places. Includes laboratory experience in the field.

COUN 584. Advanced Child and Adolescent Development. 2,3 Units.

Advanced study of child and adolescent development using topical instructional format. Explores relationship of development to family attachments, self-esteem, school achievement, and social competence. Explores counseling interventions related to development of support for relational and educational success.

COUN 604. Social Context in Clinical Practice: Gender, Class, and Race. 3 Units.

Addresses social inequalities that result in unfairness, health disparities, assaults to personal dignity, and family stress. Examines effects of social hierarchies such as gender, socioeconomic status, race, and sexual orientation on psychological and relational health. Integrates social contextual factors with recovery-based approach to clinical counseling. Cross-listing: MFAM 604.

COUN 614. Law and Ethics. 3 Units.

Examines laws, ethical standards, and current trends for mental health professionals as delineated by organizations such as ACA, ASCA, BBS, and CTC. Reviews legal and ethical guidelines for mental health counseling with individuals and families, including topics related to child welfare, separation, divorce, and financial aspects of family maintenance. Emphasizes ethical counselor-client relationships and collaboration with mental health colleagues. Explores counselor's sense of self, human values, professional behavior, scope of practice, and ethics. Assists in understanding impact of culture, poverty, social stress, and biology on the recovery process. Cross-listing: MFAM 614.

COUN 624. Individual and Systems Assessment. 3 Units.

Applies psychological testing methods in the diagnostic assessment of individual, family, and group behavioral dynamics as encountered in marriage and family counseling and related experience. Observations and/or laboratory experience.

COUN 638. Family Therapy and Chemical Abuse. 3 Units.

Current theories and treatment of chemical dependencies. Emphasizes family therapy, assessment techniques, understanding of how chemicals affect the mental and biological systems, issues of dual diagnosis.

COUN 644. Child Abuse and Family Violence. 3 Units.

Identifies and defines psychological and emotional abuse, neglect, sexual molestation, dynamics of family violence, and characteristics of offenders and nonoffenders. Examines modalities and treatment considerations related to individual and group work with children, adolescents, adults abused as children, families, and unrelated group members. Addresses ethical and legal issues, confidentiality, community resources, and multidisciplinary approaches to child abuse assessment and interview techniques. Explores impact of culture, SES, poverty, and social stressors on family mental health. Minimum of 30 contact hours. Cross-listing: MFAM 644.

COUN 674. Human Sexual Behavior. 3 Units.

Sexuality in contemporary society from the sociopsychological viewpoint. Anatomy and physiology of human sexuality: reproduction, normal and abnormal sexual response, psychosexual development, human fertility, human sexual dysfunction. Integration of systems theory. A minimum of thirty contact hours.

COUN 675. Dynamics of Aging. 1,2 Unit.

Studies aging and related processes of personal and systemic change, such as developmental and self-actualization challenges, retirement, chronic illness, long term care, losses, and other end-of-life issues. Additional unit of study involves laboratory field experience.

COUN 678. Consultation and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

Examines principles and practices of consultation and program evaluation within educational and clinical counseling environments. Emphasizes systemic concepts, leadership development, counselor advocacy, relational competence, team building, and professional accountability of personnel and programs.

COUN 679. Professional School Counseling. 3 Units.

Integrates knowledge and skills essential for development, implementation, coordination, and supervision of counseling programs within educational institutions—with emphasis on the role and function of school counselors in preschool, elementary, middle, and secondary grades. Applications made to state graduation requirements, case management, school law, community, consultation, and professional ethics.

COUN 680. Field Experience in Counseling. 3-9 Units.

Student demonstrates knowledge and skills within supervised field experience in schools and other agencies. Competencies include areas of educational assessment, personal and social counseling, academic and career counseling, program development, program coordination and supervision, consultation, legal aspects, and professional ethics. State pupil personnel services (PPS) requires a minimum of 600 clock hours—which must include two educational levels, public school activity, and involvement with students from diverse cultural-ethnic-language backgrounds.
Prerequisite: Department approval at least six weeks prior to placement; and state clearances for health, character, and competence in basic skills.

COUN 681. School Counseling Practicum and Seminar. 1 Unit.

Focuses on California standards for the pupil personnel services (PPS) credential in school counseling and K-12 public school counseling programs. Addresses professional development and practice of school counseling through readings, case presentation, University mentoring, and group process. Enrollment restricted to students in the M.S. degree in Counseling Program and in the School Counseling Certificate Program. Requires minimum of two quarters of COUN 681 School Counseling and practicum.

COUN 682. Clinical Counseling Practicum and Seminar. 1 Unit.

Focuses on California standards for licensure as a licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC). Addresses professional development and practice of clinical counseling through readings, case presentations, University mentoring, and group process. Enrollment restricted to students in M.S. degree in Counseling Program. Registration in COUN 682 required during every quarter of field experience in clinical counseling.

COUN 691. Process Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Explores advanced process approaches to theory and experiential work that are fundamental to understandings of self-awareness, relationship skills, behavioral observations, self-regulatory processes, emotion-focused therapy, and counselor-client contact with individuals and groups. Involves live demonstrations of professional counseling, in-class role play, and laboratory experiences that utilize recording and evaluation of student practice sessions. Enrollment restricted to candidates in clinical degree programs.

COUN 692. Cognitive Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Integrates advanced cognitive approaches with experiential work, including current practice of cognitive behavioral therapies such as DBT and TF-CBT. Includes live demonstrations of professional counseling, in-class role play, and laboratory experiences that utilize recording and evaluation of student practice sessions. Enrollment restricted to candidates in clinical degree programs.

COUN 693. Systemic Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 2 Units.

Integrates theory and advanced approaches to counseling individuals and groups within various systems. Demonstrates evidenced-based psychoeducation programs, therapy structures, and mental health delivery methods, with emphasis on recovery care and trauma response models. Enrollment restricted to candidates in clinical degree programs.

COUN 694. Directed Study: Counseling. 1-4 Units.

Directed study in counseling.

COUN 781. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 782. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 783. School Counseling Field Experience (PPS). 4 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 200 hours of counseling activities supervised by a PPS-credentialed school counselor at a public school site. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 784. School Counseling Field Experience. 3 Units.

Fourth course in a series of 3-unit registrations (COUN 781-786) for University-arranged field experience in school counseling. Requires that student document 100 hours of counseling practicum; obtain a certificate of clearance from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing; and subsequently complete 100 hours of supervised counseling in a public school, with on-site supervision by a PPS-credentialed school counselor. Enrollment restricted to students in the M.S. degree in Counseling Program and/or the School Counseling Certificate Program who are working toward the pupil personnel services credential (PPS) in school counseling.

COUN 791. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, and other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress notation (IP) until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 792. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, and other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an ongoing field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress notation (IP) until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

COUN 793. Clinical Counseling Field Experience (LPCC). 3 Units.

Requires successful completion and evaluation of 150 hours—at least 100 of which must be supervised, face-to-face clinical counseling supported by a minimum of 50 hours involving supervision, reporting, documentation, or other counseling-related activities. Students may continue an on-going field experience registration over a period of five quarters, with an In Progress (IP) notation until the fifth quarter, which must be graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).