School of Behavioral Health

Dean's welcome

Beverly J. Buckles, D.S.W.

We're glad you have chosen to consider Loma Linda University's School of Behavioral Health as you make plans to continue your educational goals. This Catalog describes who we are and what we have to offer. It will familiarize you with the philosophy and structure of our programs, and will provide you with a listing of the participating faculty.

Loma Linda University is a religious, nonprofit institution that welcomes students and staff from a broad spectrum of religious persuasions while reserving the right to give preference to qualified members of its sponsoring denomination. As stated in its nondiscrimination policy, the institution "affirms that all persons are of equal worth in the sight of God and they should so be regarded by all people." Since several of the professions—for which programs within the School of Behavioral Health (SBH) prepare students—have a tradition of advocacy for oppressed peoples, it is important that the institution, faculty, and staff demonstrate their acceptance of and willingness to assist those in our society who are less privileged. The University actively sponsors several programs that move the institutional health-care personnel resources and expertise into the local, national, and international communities to work with otherwise underserved populations. This component of service is an integral part of the statement of mission and a message intended to be captured in the Good Samaritan sculpture that occupies a central position on the campus.

The School of Behavioral Health, as part of the University, has expectations of students, faculty, and staff in the areas of conduct and behavior while they are on campus or involved in school or University activities. The school does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, age, ethnic or national origin, or handicap. Enrollment of students in SBH programs is not conditioned on their political or sexual orientation; in these areas, the school's policy is directed towards conduct or disruptive behavior, not orientation. In support of this position, we expect our students, faculty, and staff to demonstrate unwavering respect for the diversity of others and to interact with integrity—never forgetting the standards that guide professional actions. Further, we expect our programs through their faculty to develop competent, compassionate, ethical professionals who possess the knowledge, skills, and values to equip them for a life dedicated to service to all those in need—regardless of their lifestyles.

You will find vigorous academic programs that will stretch your mind as you take time to make new discoveries, get to understand our world, and apply Christ-centered values to your life and profession.

Our administrators, faculty, and staff are here to work with you and help you prepare for your future as a caring, Christian professional in the world of service to mankind. If you would like to know more about us, you can call us toll free at 800/422-4LLU.

Beverly J. Buckles, D.S.W.
Dean, School of Behavioral Health

 

School foundations

The School of Behavioral Health includes the Departments of Counseling and Family Sciences, Psychology, and Social Work and Social Ecology; and the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies. The school offers master's and doctoral degree programs, as well as a number of postbaccalaureate and postdegree certificates. These programs equip graduates with the leading-edge knowledge and practice experiences necessary for careers in behavioral health practice, research, or administration.

Philosophy

The School of Behavioral Health is grounded in a deep commitment to the University’s mission to further the teaching and healing ministries of Jesus Christ, which produces wholeness within transformed lives. Transformation is viewed as a lifelong journey of faith and learning underpinned by a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective, which assumes that wholeness is achieved when all subsystems affecting human needs are understood and in balance. This pursuit seeks to understand and promote healthy minds, communities, social systems, and human relationships that enable individuals to experience resiliency and live meaningful lives. Such wholeness manifests itself in a life of service to humanity and to God.

In the School of Behavioral Health, these purposes are achieved through academic programs—including research, clinical practice, and global learning experiences that engage faculty and students in the highest levels of scholarship, professionalism, and quest for wholeness. Because these pursuits are served by knowledge, graduate students are obliged to achieve both broad and detailed mastery of their fields of study and participate with the faculty in the process by which knowledge is created and applied. The end result is firm adherence to the global traditions of Loma Linda University through scholarly and practice pursuits that aim to strengthen the effectiveness of behavioral health practice and research to improve the quality of life for individuals and communities around the world.

Goals

The School of Behavioral Health attempts to create an environment favorable to the pursuit of knowledge and meaning by:

  1. Making available to graduate students who wish to study in a Seventh-day Adventist Christian setting the education necessary for scholarly and professional careers in the behavioral health professions.
  2. Encouraging development of independent judgment, mastery of research techniques, and contribution to scholarly communication.
  3. Fostering the integration of science and practice in the service of humankind.

Learning outcomes and assessment

Supporting these goals, the School of Behavioral Health has adopted Loma Linda University's institutional learning outcomes (ILOs).

The School of Behavioral Health supports the realization of the University’s learning outcomes through the curricula of its degree programs by providing students with content and active learning experiences that reflect the current practice and professional knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes needed for competent practice in behavioral health, including, but not limited to:

  • Professional and personal self care
  • Ethical and professional standards of conduct and behavior
  • Legal and statutory mandates affecting practice
  • Clinical knowledge shared and specific to disciplines
  • Therapeutic and reflective use of self
  • Analytical methods supporting scholarship and the integration of science and practice in the development of new knowledge and improved services
  • Professional communication and presentation skills
  • Strengths perspectives supporting wellness, recovery, and anti-stigma
  • Integration of spirituality and cultural competency
  • Integration of behavioral health into primary health care
  • Global context of behavioral health practice
  • Collegial and collaborative team practice
  • Commitment to continuous professional development, service, and lifelong learning

The assessment of the University’s student learning outcomes is integrated into the specific program and department criteria and methods used to address professional accreditation assessment requirements. Where possible, these data are used to support the development of school-wide metrics.

Mission

Operationalizing this philosophy, the mission of the School of Behavioral Health is to provide graduate-level education that prepares competent, ethical, and compassionate professionals who possess the knowledge, values, and skills necessary for a life dedicated to whole person care in behavioral health practice, research, and servant leadership.

Application and acceptance

Application procedure

  1. The application instructions, available on the Web at <llu.edu/central/apply>, allow students to apply online and begin an application. Applications and all supporting information, transcripts, test results, and references should be submitted by the deadline posted on the application, per degree.
  2. Complete official transcripts of all academic records from all colleges, universities, and professional or technical schools must be provided for official acceptance into a program. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange to have the transcripts—including official English translations, if applicable—sent directly to Admissions Processing by the issuing institution. Transcripts that come via an intermediary are unacceptable.
  3. A personal interview is often desirable and is required by some programs. The interview should be arranged with the coordinator of the program in which the student wishes to study.

Acceptance procedure

  1. When the program that the student wishes to enter has evaluated the applications and made its recommendation, the dean of the School of Behavioral Health takes official action and notifies the applicant. The applicant must respond affirmatively before becoming eligible to register in the School of Behavioral Health.
  2. As part of registration, accepted students will be asked to file with Student Health Service a medical history with evidence of certain immunizations.
  3. Transcripts of records and all other application documents are retained by the University and may not be withdrawn and used for any purpose. Records of students who do not enroll or who withdraw prior to completion are retained for two years from the date of original acceptance to a School of Behavioral Health program.
  4. New students are required to pass a background check before they register for classes.

Admission requirements

A four-year baccalaureate degree (or its equivalent) from an accredited college or university is a prerequisite for admission to the School of Behavioral Health's graduate programs. Transcripts of the applicant's scholastic record should show appropriate preparation, in grades and content, for the curriculum chosen. Since there is some variation in the pattern of undergraduate courses prescribed by different programs, the applicant should note the specific requirements of the chosen program. Deficiencies may be fulfilled while enrolled; prerequisites must be completed prior to matriculation.

Scholarship

Applicants are expected to present an undergraduate record with a grade point average of B (3.0) or better in the overall program and in the major field. Depending on program-specific criteria, some students with an overall grade point average between 2.5 and 3.0 may be admitted provisionally to graduate standing, provided the grades of the junior and senior years are superior or there is other evidence of capability.

Graduate Record Examination

Scores on the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required with application for admission to many degree programs. New test scores are needed if it has been more than five years since the last test was taken. Applicants are advised to request information specific to their proposed program of study.

For complete information about the GRE, please visit their Web site at <http://www.ets.org/gre/>; or write to Educational Testing Service, 1947 Center Street, Berkeley, CA 94701 (for the West); and P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541 (for the East). For GRE publications (including study materials), call 800/537-3160.

Programs that do not require the GRE must submit one additional measure of a candidate's preparation for graduate study. This may be either an evaluation of critical essay-writing skills, the Miller Analogies Test, the results of a structured interview, or other specified program criteria.

Re-entrance

Students who are currently enrolled in the School of Behavioral Health may request transfer to a different program or a more advanced degree level by contacting the School of Behavioral Health Admissions Office for information on an abbreviated application and instructions for submitting the appropriate supporting documents. Transcripts on file with the University are acceptable.

English-language competence

All international students are encouraged (particularly those who do not have an adequate score on TOEFL or MTELP or other evidence of English proficiency) to attend an intensive American Language Institute prior to entering their program, because further study of English may be required to assure academic progress.

Graduate degree requirements

Minimum required grade point average

Students must maintain a grade point average of at least a B (3.0) to continue in regular standing. This average is to be computed separately for courses and research. Courses in which a student earns a grade between C (2.0) and B (3.0) may or may not apply toward the degree, at the discretion of the guidance committee. A student submitting transfer credits must earn a B average on all work accepted for transfer credit and on all work taken at this University, computed separately.

From Master’s to Ph.D. degree

Bypassing master’s degree

A graduate student at this University may proceed first to a master’s degree. If at the time of application the student wishes to qualify for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, this intention should be declared even if the first objective is a master’s degree.

If after admission to the master’s degree program a student wishes to go on to the doctoral degree, an abbreviated application should be completed and submitted, along with appropriate supporting documents, to the School of Behavioral Health Admissions Office. If the award of the master’s degree is sought, the student will be expected to complete that degree before embarking on doctoral activity for credit. A student who bypasses the master’s degree may be permitted, on the recommendation of the guidance committee and with the consent of the dean, to transfer courses and research that have been completed in the appropriate field and are of equivalent quality and scope to his/her doctoral program.

Second master’s degree

A student who wishes to qualify for an additional master’s degree in a different discipline may apply. The dean of the School of Behavioral Health and the faculty of the program the student wishes to enter will consider such a request on its individual merits.

Concurrent admission

Students may not be admitted to a School of Behavioral Health program while admitted to another program at this University or elsewhere. The exceptions to this are the combined degrees programs discussed in the next paragraph.

Combined degrees

Students may not be admitted to a School of Behavioral Health program while admitted to another program at this University or elsewhere. The exceptions to this are the combined degrees programs.

Certificate programs

The School of Behavioral Health offers several postbaccalaureate certificate programs. Students accepted into such programs will be assigned to an advisor who will work with them as they fulfill the program requirements. Students will be required to maintain a B (3.0) grade point average, with no course grade below C (2.0). All certificate students are required to take at least one 3-unit religion course (numbered between 500 and 600).

Master of Arts/Master of Science/Master of Social Work

Advisor and guidance committee

Each student accepted into a degree program is assigned an advisor who helps arrange the program of study to meet University requirements; subsequently (no later than when applying for candidacy), the student is put under the supervision of a guidance committee. This committee is responsible to and works with the coordinator of the student’s program in arranging courses, screening thesis topics (where applicable), guiding research, administering final written and/or oral examinations, evaluating the thesis and other evidence of the candidate’s fitness to receive the degree, and ultimately recommending the student for graduation.

Subject prerequisites and deficiencies

Gaps in an applicant’s academic achievement will be identified by subject and classified either as prerequisites or as subject deficiencies. Applicants lacking certain subject or program prerequisites may not be admitted to the master’s degree program until the prerequisites are completed (at Loma Linda University or elsewhere) and acceptable grades are reported. However, subject deficiencies do not exclude an applicant from admission or enrollment; but these must be removed as specified by the advisor or dean, usually during the first full quarter of study at this University.

Study plan

The student’s advisor should develop with the student a written outline of the complete graduate experience, with time and activity specified as fully as possible. This will serve as a guide to both the student and the advisor, as well as to members of the guidance committee when it is selected.

The study plan is changed only after careful consultation. The student is ultimately responsible for ensuring both timely registration and completion of all required courses.

Time limit

The time allowed from admission to the School of Behavioral Health to conferring of the master’s degree may not exceed five years. Some consideration may be given to a short extension of time if, in the dean’s opinion, such is merited.

Course credit allowed toward the master’s degree is nullified seven years from the date of course completion. Nullified courses may be revalidated, upon successful petition, through reading, conferences, written reports, or examination to assure currency in the content.

Residence

Students must meet the residence requirements indicated for their particular program (never less than one academic quarter). The master’s degree candidate must complete one quarter of full-time study at the University or perform the thesis research at the University. Although the number of units students take varies by program, students are expected to work closely with their advisors to assure that their course loads are consistent with program requirements, as well as degree completion options and timelines.

Professional performance probation

Applied professional programs may recommend that the student be placed on professional performance probation. Details are contained in program guides for the programs concerned.

Comprehensive and final examinations

The student must take the written, oral, and final examinations prescribed by the program on or before the published dates. If a candidate fails to pass the oral or written examination for a graduate degree, the committee files a written analysis of the candidate’s status with the dean, with recommendations regarding the student’s future relation to the school. The student receives a copy of the committee’s recommendation.

Research competence

Student skills required in research, language, investigation, and computation are specified in each program description in this CATALOG.

Thesis

Students writing a thesis must register for at least 1 unit of thesis credit. The research and thesis preparation are under the direction of the student’s guidance committee. The student is urged to secure the committee’s approval of the topic and research design as early as possible. Such approval must be secured before petition is made for candidacy.

The student must register and pay tuition for thesis credit, whether the work is done in residence or in absentia. If the student has been advanced to candidacy, has completed all course requirements, and has registered for but not completed the research and thesis, continuous registration is to be maintained until the manuscript has been accepted. This involves a quarterly enrollment fee paid at the beginning of each quarter.

Candidacy

Admission to the School of Behavioral Health or designation of regular graduate standing does not constitute admission of the student to candidacy for a graduate degree. After achieving regular status, admission to candidacy is initiated by a written petition (School of Behavioral Health Form A) from the student to the dean, on recommendation of the student’s advisor and the program coordinator or department chair.

Students petitioning the School of Behavioral Health for candidacy for the master’s degree must present a satisfactory grade record, include a statement of the proposed thesis or dissertation topic (where applicable) that has been approved by the student’s guidance committee, and note any other qualification prescribed by the program. Students are usually advanced to candidacy during the third quarter after entering their course of study toward a degree in the School of Behavioral Health.

Specific program requirements

In addition to the foregoing, the student is subject to the requirements stated in the section of the CATALOG governing the specific program chosen.

Religion requirement

All master’s degree students are required to take at least one 3-unit religion course (courses numbered between 500 and 600). Students should check with their programs for specific guidelines.

Combined degrees programs

A number of combined degrees programs are offered, each intended to provide more comprehensive preparation in clinical applications and the biomedical sciences. Concurrent admission to two programs in the School of Behavioral Health or to a program in the School of Behavioral Health and to a professional school in the University is required. These curricula are described in greater detail under the heading “Combined Degrees Programs” in this section of the CATALOG.

Thesis and dissertation

The student’s research and thesis or dissertation preparation are under the direction of the student’s guidance committee. The student is urged to secure the committee’s approval of the topic and research design as early as is feasible. Such approval must be secured before petition is made for advancement to candidacy.

Format guide

Instructions for the preparation and format of the publishable paper, thesis, or dissertation are in the “Thesis and Dissertation Format Guide,” available through the Faculty of Graduate Studies dissertation editor. Consultation with the dissertation editor can help the student avoid formatting errors that would require him/her to retype large sections of manuscript. The last day for submitting copies to the school office in final approved form is published in the events calendar (available from the academic dean’s office).

Binding

The cost of binding copies of the thesis or dissertation to be deposited in the University Library and appropriate department or school collection will be paid for by the student’s department. The student will be responsible for paying the cost of binding additional personal copies.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded for evidence of mature scholarship; productive promise; and active awareness of the history, resources, and demands of a specialized field.

Advisor and guidance committee

Each student, upon acceptance into a degree program, is assigned an advisor who helps arrange the study program. Subsequently (no later than when applying for candidacy), the student is put under the supervision of a guidance committee. The School of Behavioral Health requires advisors for Doctor of Philosophy degree candidates to have demonstrated scholarship productivity in their chosen disciplines. Each program maintains a list of qualified doctoral degree mentors. The guidance committee, usually chaired by the advisor, is responsible to and works with the coordinator of the student’s program in arranging course sequences, screening dissertation topics, recommending candidacy, guiding research, administering written and oral examinations, evaluating the dissertation/project and other evidence of the candidate’s fitness to receive the degree, and recommending the student for graduation.

Subject prerequisites and deficiencies

Gaps in an applicant’s academic achievement will be identified by subjects and classified as either prerequisites or as subject deficiencies.

Applicants lacking subject or program prerequisites may not be admitted to the Ph.D. degree program until the prerequisites are completed (at Loma Linda University or elsewhere) with acceptable grades.

Subject deficiencies do not exclude an applicant from admission or enrollment; but they must be removed as specified by the advisor or dean, usually at the beginning of the graduate experience at this University.

Study plan

The student’s advisor should develop with the student a written outline of the complete graduate experience, with time and activity specified as fully as possible. This serves as a guide to both the student and the advisor, as well as to members of the guidance committee when it is selected. The study plan is changed only after careful consultation. The student is ultimately responsible for ensuring both timely registration and completion of required courses.

Time limit

Completion of the graduate experience signals currency and competence in the discipline. The dynamic nature of the biological sciences makes dilatory or even leisurely pursuit of the degree unacceptable. Seven years are allowed for completion after admission to the Ph.D. degree program. Extension of time may be granted on petition if recommended by the guidance committee to the dean of the School of Behavioral Health.

Course credit allowed toward the doctorate is nullified eight years from the date of course completion. To assure currency in the content, nullified courses may be revalidated—upon successful petition—through reading, conference, written reports, or examination.

Residence

The School of Behavioral Health requires two years of residency for the doctoral degrees—D.M.F.T, Psy.D., Ph.D.—spent on the campus of the University after enrollment in a doctoral degree program. During residence, students devote full time to graduate activity in courses, research, or a combination of these. A full load of courses is 8 or more units each quarter; 36 or more clock hours per week is full time in research.

Students may be advised to pursue for limited periods at special facilities studies not available at Loma Linda University. Such time may be considered residence if the arrangement is approved in advance by the dean of the School of Behavioral Health.

The spirit and demands of doctoral degree study require full-time devotion to courses, research, reading, and reflection. But neither the passage of time nor preoccupation with study assures success. Evidence of high scholarship and original contribution to the field or professional competence form the basis for determining the awarding of the degree.

Professional performance probation

Applied professional programs may recommend that the student be placed on professional performance probation. Details are contained in the program guides for the programs concerned.

Scholarly competence

Doctoral degree students demonstrate competency in scholarship along with research and professional development. Expectations and standards of achievement with the tools of investigation, natural and synthetic languages, and computers are specified in this section of the CATALOG for each program.

Comprehensive examinations

The doctoral degree candidate is required to take comprehensive written and oral examinations over the principal areas of study to ascertain capacity for independent, productive, scientific work; and to determine whether further courses are required before the final year of preparation for the doctorate is undertaken. The program coordinator is responsible for arranging preparation and administration of the examination, as well as its evaluation and subsequent reports of results. Success in the comprehensive examination is a prerequisite to candidacy (see below).

Students cannot be admitted to the examination until they have:

  • Demonstrated reading knowledge of one foreign language, if applicable;
  • Completed the majority of units required beyond the master’s degree or its equivalent.

The final oral examination

After completion of the dissertation and not later than a month before the date of graduation, the doctoral degree candidate is required to appear before an examining committee for the final oral examination.

If a candidate fails to pass this final examination for a graduate degree, the examining committee files  a written analysis of the candidate’s status with the dean, with recommendations about the student’s future relation to the school. The student receives a copy of the committee’s recommendation.

Project

(required for the Doctor of Psychology and Doctor of Marital and Family Therapy degrees)

All Doctor of Psychology degree students must register for at least 1 unit of project credit. This should be done during the last quarter of registration prior to completion.

The research and project preparation are under the direction of the student’s guidance committee. The student is urged to secure the committee’s approval of the topic and research design as early as possible. Such approval must be secured before petition is made for advancement to candidacy.

If the student has been advanced to candidacy, has completed all course requirements, and has registered for but not completed the research and project, continuous registration is maintained until the manuscript is accepted. This involves a quarterly fee to be paid during registration each quarter. A continuing registration fee is also assessed for each quarter the student fails to register for new units.

Dissertation

(required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree)

All doctoral students must register for at least 1 unit of research credit. This should be done during the last quarter of registration prior to completion.

The research and dissertation preparation are under the direction of the student’s guidance committee. The student is urged to secure the committee’s approval of the topic and research design as early as possible. Such approval must be secured before petition is made for advancement to candidacy.

Consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies dissertation editor can prevent the student from committing formatting errors that would require retyping large sections of the manuscript.

Students register and pay tuition for the dissertation, whether the work is done in residence or in absentia. If the student has been advanced to candidacy, has completed all course requirements, and has registered for but not completed the research and dissertation, continuous registration is maintained until the manuscript is accepted. This involves a quarterly fee to be paid during registration each quarter. A continuing registration fee is also assessed for each quarter the student fails to register for new units.

Doctoral dissertations are reported to University Microfilms International and to the National Opinion Research Center. The Faculty of Graduate Studies provides appropriate information and forms.

Candidacy

Admission to the School of Behavioral Health does not constitute candidacy for a graduate degree. Admission to candidacy is initiated by a written petition (School of Behavioral Health Form A) from the student to the dean, with support from the student’s advisor and the program chair.

The student’s petition for candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree will include confirmation that comprehensive written and oral examinations have been passed.

Students expecting the award of the doctorate at a June graduation should have achieved candidacy no later than the previous November 15. One full quarter must be allowed between the achievement of candidacy and the quarter of completion.

Specific program requirements

Doctoral programs differ from each other. The unique program requirements appear in the programs section of this CATALOG (Section III) and in the program guides available from specific departments.

Religion requirement

All doctoral students should take at least three 3-unit religion courses (numbered between 500 and 600). Students should check with their programs for specific guidelines.

Combined degrees programs

A number of combined degrees programs are offered, each intended to provide additional preparation in clinical, professional, or basic areas related to the student’s field of interest. All require concurrent admission to the School of Behavioral Health and a professional school in the University. The combined degrees programs provide opportunity for especially well-qualified and motivated students to pursue professional and graduate education; and to prepare for careers in clinical specialization, teaching, or investigation of problems of health and disease in humans.

For admission to a combined degrees program, the student must have a baccalaureate degree; must qualify for admission to the School of Behavioral Health; and must already be admitted to the School of Medicine, the School of Dentistry, the School of Religion, or the School of Public Health. Application may be made at any point in the student’s progress in the professional school, though it is usually made during the sophomore year. Students in this curriculum study toward the M.A., M.S., M.S.W., Psy.D., or Ph.D. degree.

Students may be required to interrupt their professional study for two or more years (as needed) for courses and research for the graduate degree sought. Elective time in the professional school may be spent in meeting School of Behavioral Health requirements.

The student’s concurrent status is regarded as continuous until the program is completed or until discontinuance is recommended by the School of Behavioral Health or the professional school. The usual degree requirements apply.

The following combined degrees programs are offered in conjunction with the School of Behavioral Health. (See Combined Degrees Programs at the end of Section III.)

Marital and Family Therapy with Clinical Ministry (M.S./M.A.)

Social Policy and Social Research with Biomedical and Clinical Ethics (Ph.D./M.A.)

Social Work with Criminal Justice (M.S.W./M.S.)

Social Work with Gerontology (M.S.W./M.S.)

Social Work with Social Policy and Social Research (M.S.W./Ph.D.)

Student life

The information on student life contained in this CATALOG is brief. The Student Handbook more comprehensively addresses University and school expectations, regulations, and policies; and is available to each registered student. Students need to familiarize themselves with the contents of the Student Handbook. Additional information regarding policies specific to a particular school or program within the University is available from the respective school.

The School of Behavioral Health prepares the school-specific Policies and Procedures Manual, which is provided to all School of Behavioral Health students. Regulations, policies, procedures, and other program requirements are contained in this manual.

Academic information

Conditions of registration, residence, attendance

Academic residence

A student must meet the residence requirements indicated for a particular degree, which is never less than one academic quarter. A year of residence is defined as three quarters of academic work. A student is in full-time residence if registered for at least 8 units. A maximum of 12 units may be taken without special petition to the dean of the School of Behavioral Health, unless the student is enrolled in an approved block-registration program or the program requirements specify otherwise.

Transfer credits

Transfer credits will not be used to offset course work at this University that earns less than a B average. This transfer is limited to credits that have not already been applied to a degree and for which a grade of B (3.0) or better has been recorded. A maximum of 9 quarter units that have been previously applied to another degree may be accepted as transfer credits upon petition. A candidate who holds a master’s degree or presents its equivalent by transcript may receive credit up to 20 percent of the total units for the degree, subject to the consent of the dean and the department chair involved. In such instances, the transfer student is not relieved of residence requirements at this University.

Students should also review the requirements of in their program of study as some professional degree programs require grades higher than a B (3.0) for transfer courses, and may restrict the courses and/or experiences that may be transferred from other academic institutions.

If permitted for transfer, credit for practicum experiences is allowed only where university credit has been received for equivalent experiences. Credit for life and/or work experiences cannot be used to meet the requirements in any degree or certificate program in the School of Behavioral Health.

Advanced standing

Advanced standing is a designation used in specific professional degree programs to address possible content redundancy between levels of degrees available within those professions. Evaluation of eligibility for advanced standing is program specific when specific conditions are met. Students should review the availability of advanced standing in their program. Academic variances are used to document the availability of advanced standing.

Academic, professional, and clinical probation

Continued enrollment in a professional degree program or certificate is contingent upon a student’s continued satisfactory academic, professional, and clinical performance. Any student whose performance in any of these three areas falls below the requirements of their program, the school, or university will be placed on one or more of these types of probation.

Academic probation

Degree students whose overall grade point average falls below a 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation who fail to earn a 3.0 for the next quarter or who fail to have an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 after two quarters may be dismissed from school. Students enrolled in postbaccalaureate certificate programs should review the G.P.A. requirements of these programs, which may differ from G.P.A. requirements for degree programs.

Professional performance probation

All students enrolled in professional programs are required to adhere to the professional and ethical standards set forth by their disciplines, the school, and university. Any student whose performance is evaluated to fall below these requirements will be placed on professional performance probation. The continued enrollment for the next quarter of a student on professional probation is subject to the recommendation of the department and approval by the school’s Academic Standards Committee. Any student whose professional performance falls below these minimum requirements for two quarters (consecutive or dispersed) will be dismissed from the school. Students obtain copies of the ethical and professional performance standards set forth by their disciplines through their academic programs. The professional performance requirements for the School of Behavioral Health are included in the school’s “Policies and Procedures Manual,” which is provided to each student. The University’s conduct and behavior expectations are provided in the Loma Linda University Student Handbook.

Clinical probation

The successful completion of a clinical (or administrative) practicum is an essential requirement of professional degree programs. A student who receives an Unsatisfactory (U) in any segment or quarter of a practicum requirement is automatically placed on clinical probation. The continued enrollment for the next quarter, term, or rotation segment of a student on probation or clinical probation is subject to the recommendation of the department and approval by the school’s Academic Standards Committee. A student who receives a U grade for a second segment or quarter (consecutive or dispersed) of practicum will be dismissed from the school. Students obtain copies of the clinical and professional performance requirements for their degree through their academic programs. The clinical and professional performance requirements for the School of Behavioral Health are included in the school’s “Policies and Procedures Manual,” which is provided to each student. Relevant University conduct and behavior expectations that affect successful completion of a practicum experience are provided in the Loma Linda University Student Handbook.

Schedule of charges (2016–2017)

Tuition

$782Per unit, graduate credit
$391Per unit, audit
$34,240Per year: Psychology Psy.D. and Ph.D.

Special charges

$35Application fee*
$100Application fee for combined degrees
$793Enrollment fee per quarter
$100Psychology laboratory fee per quarter
$200Nonrefundable tuition deposit**
$40Application to add program or degree

Programs may have additional fees for course material.

*

All students who submit their application by the VIP deadline will have 100 percent of the application fee credited to their student account towards the first quarter of tuition (see dates below).

**

The $200 nonrefundable deposit will be credited to the student’s account towards the first quarter of tuition.

***

Clinical training fees apply and vary by program. Fees are at a reduced rate below the current per unit tuition rate.

VIP Application Deadline Dates
Department Fall Qtr. Winter Qtr. Spring Qtr. Summer Qtr
Marriage and Family TherapyDecember 31September 2January 1March 15
PsychologyDecember 31
Social WorkDecember 31September 2January 1March 15
Dual DegreesDecember 31September 2January 1March 15