Health Education — Dr.P.H.

Program director
Anna Nelson

The Dr.P.H. degree in health education is designed for individuals who desire to add depth to their health education specialization and develop research and leadership capabilities. The emphasis on health education offers advanced knowledge and competencies in the health education process and includes advocacy, critical analysis, leadership, professionalism, and ethics; as well as other health education domains. The Dr.P.H.degree in health education is offered in two formats: on campus and online technology-mediated.

The online technology-mediated format targets working professionals. The curriculum consists of synchronous learning, online courses, and blended courses. Specific hardware and software requirements for the program must be met. Students are expected to be present on campus during the research process to defend their proposals and dissertation.

Learner outcomes

Upon completion of the Dr.P.H. degree in health education, the graduate should be able to:

  • Conduct health education research and evaluation utilizing basic statistical concepts.
  • Generate health-related educational training/curricular materials and conduct professional seminars and training programs.
  • Promote and assist in the development of grant-writing proposals and applications for community-based health education research.
  • Creatively apply theoretical concepts to program design for health education interventions/write and submit manuscripts to professional journals for publication.
  • Demonstrate educational leadership skills, policy development, and strategic planning for organizations and agencies.

Educational effectiveness indicators

  • Comprehensive examination
  • Dissertation proposal defense (qualifying examination)
  • Advancement to candidacy
  • Publishable research paper
  • Dissertation defense

Prerequisite

In addition to the entrance requirements for all Dr.P.H. degrees, applicants to the Dr.P.H. degree program in health education must have:

  • M.P.H. degree in health education, health behavior, or health promotion; or a master's degree in a health-related field preferred
  • Post-master's degree work experience preferred
  • Social science (two courses, which may include psychology, sociology, or cultural anthropology)
  • Quantitative proficiency (e.g., statistics course, quantitative score on the GRE examination, or other demonstration of proficiency)

Corequisites

See standard DrPH corequisites.

Health Education Major
HPRO 543Writing for Health Professionals3
HPRO 588Health Behavior Theory and Research4
HPRO 589Qualitative Research Methods3
HPRO 608Advanced Seminar in Health Education 16
HPRO__Health Education 212
Administration and leadership
HPRO 535Health Education Administration and Leadership3
Elective 39
Cognate
Elective 49
Religion
RELE 5__Graduate-level ethics3
RELR 5__Graduate-level relational3
RELT 5__Graduate-level theological3
Research and evaluation
HPRO 534AResearch Methods2
HPRO 534BResearch Methods2
HPRO 544Health Education Evaluation and Measurement3
HPRO 685Preliminary Research Experience2
HPRO 697Dissertation Proposal6
PHCJ 604Research Seminar 52
STAT 514Intermediate Statistics for Health-Science Data 63
STAT 549Analytical Applications of SPSS2
STAT 568Data Analysis 73
Dissertation
HPRO 698Dissertation 812
Total Units95
1

Multiple registrations required to fulfill total units. 2 units in Autumn, Winter and Spring terms.

2

Choose 12 units, in consultation with advisor. A minimum of nine (9) units must be taken from HPRO.

3

Courses chosen in consultation with advisor

4

Courses chosen in consultation with advisor; usually from a different discipline or school

5

Taken after HPRO 534A Research Methods and HPRO 534B Research Methods

6

Taken after STAT 549 Analytical Applications of SPSS

7

Taken after STAT 514 Intermediate Statistics for Health-Science Data

8

Multiple registrations required to fulfill total units

Culminating experience

As a part of the culminating experience, the student completes two publishable scientific papers for submission to peer reviewed journals, successfully defends dissertation, and submits a committee approved dissertation manuscript. Further details provided in the Doctoral Handbook.

Normal time to complete the program

5 years based on less than full-time

Courses

HPRO 500. Stress Management. 2 Units.

Covers aspects of stress as it relates to health. Addresses definitions of stress, emphasizing the potential effect of stress on physical and mental diseases. Presents coping mechanisms, e.g., cognitive behavior therapy, music therapy, spirituality, and several other techniques. Presented in a service-learning format in which students are in direct contact with the community applying stress-prevention and coping strategies.

HPRO 501. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 6 Units.

Systematic investigation of the form and function of human biological systems. Laboratory included. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 502. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 6 Units.

Continues HPRO 501. Systematically investigates the form and function of human biological systems. Laboratory included. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 509. Principles of Health Behavior. 3 Units.

Introduces key health behavior-change theories and psychosocial determinants of health behaviors. Provides an overview of motivation, stress and coping, addiction, culture, and religion as related to health behavior. Laboratory emphasizes communication, leadership, and group process activities.

HPRO 515. Mind-Body Interactions and Health Outcomes. 4 Units.

Studies the effect of the neurological system on physical health, with a focus on psychoneuro-immunology. Summarizes scientific disciplines that study brain, immune system, and health behavior interactions that provide the healthcare professional with an integrative understanding of lifestyle, whole person care for immune system function and wellness.
Prerequisite: Anatomy and physiology, biochemistry.

HPRO 519. Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Basic and clinical pharmacology. Emphasizes drugs of concern to health promotion specialists. Principles of drug addiction, drug receptors and pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and practical uses for drugs.
Prerequisite: Anatomy and physiology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry.

HPRO 523. Maternal/Child Health: Policy and Programs. 3 Units.

Examines national and global public health policy, initiatives, and programs targeting childbearing women, as well as infants and children. Explores selected issues—such as poverty, access to and utilization of health care, violence, and perinatal chemical exposure—within socioeconomic, political, and ethical frameworks. Emphasizes interdisciplinary delivery of services within a public health setting.

HPRO 524. Child and Adolescent Health. 3 Units.

Studies developmental and health problems unique to the child and adolescent periods of life. Focuses on special needs and public health programs designed to reach children and adolescents. Gives attention to special problems, such as social adaptation, juvenile delinquency, drug abuse, suicide, adolescent pregnancy.

HPRO 526. Lifestyle Diseases and Risk Reduction. 3 Units.

Discusses current lifestyle diseases, including: cardiovascular, metabolic, communicable, and nutritional. Concepts regarding risk factors, screening approaches, and risk reduction, with impact on specific health parameters.
Prerequisite: Anatomy and physiology; or consent of instructor.

HPRO 527. Obesity and Disordered Eating. 3 Units.

Explores causes and development of obesity, principles of weight management, and relapse prevention. Includes discussion of the causes and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia.

HPRO 529. Preventive and Therapeutic Interventions in Chronic Disease. 4 Units.

Specific preventive care techniques dealing with lifestyle and chronic disease in the clinical environment. Multidisciplinary lifestyle interventions in the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, sleep disorders, and other chronic conditions. Uses case studies and role playing to explore interventions in a variety of clinical scenarios.

HPRO 530. Fundamentals of Research in Health Behavior and Health Education. 3 Units.

Introduces research in the behavioral health sciences and health education. Helps students apply appropriate research principles and techniques in health education. Provides an overview of the philosophy and methods of science—including causal inference, developing research questions and testing hypotheses, and identifying appropriate data collection techniques. Emphasizes development of a practical understanding of why, when, and how to use research methods; and how to become an informed reader of scientific research articles and reports. Addresses experimental methods, surveys, and quantitative research designs. Covers other topics, including assessments of reliability, validity, measurement, and research ethics.

HPRO 531. Pathology of Human Systems I. 3 Units.

Fundamental mechanisms of disease, including degenerative changes and physical and chemical injury. Reviews diseases by organ system: endocrine, biliary, hepatic, respiratory, digestive, urogenital, skeletal, and central nervous. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 532. Pathology of Human Systems II. 3 Units.

Introduces micropathological organisms. Surveys tissue changes in infectious diseases. Growth disorders, including: basic genetic problems and neoplasia; cardiovascular, circulatory, and inflammatory systems. Limited to doctoral degree students.
Prerequisite: HPRO 531.

HPRO 534A. Research Methods. 2 Units.

Philosophy of scientific research, sources of research invalidity, quantitative and qualitative literature review techniques, setting research goals and objectives, quasi-experimental and experimental design, research ethics. Requires presentation and critique of published research and literature review. Taken over the course of two quarters for a total of 4 units (HPRO 534A, 2 units Winter Quarter; and HPRO 534B, 2 units Spring Quarter). Doctoral students only.
Prerequisite: STAT 509.

HPRO 534B. Research Methods. 2 Units.

Philosophy of scientific research, sources of research invalidity, quantitative and qualitative literature review techniques, setting research goals and objectives, quasi-experimental and experimental design, research ethics. Requires presentation and critique of published research and literature review. Taken over the course of two quarters for a total of 4 units (HPRO 534A , 2 units Winter Quarter; and HPRO 534B, 2 units Spring Quarter). Doctoral students only.
Prerequisite: HPRO 534A.

HPRO 535. Health Education Administration and Leadership. 3 Units.

Analyzes the managerial and leadership roles of the health education specialist in both public and private health organizations. Emphasizes organizational structure and health communication; as well as managing, supervising, marketing, decision making, and other administrative roles.

HPRO 536. Program Planning and Evaluation. 2 Units.

Introductory course that utilizes the planning cycle to address public health problems. Analyzes trends in health-care planning. Applies planning cycle to selected topics. Provides overview of evaluation design, methodology, and instrument development for health education programs. Laboratory included.

HPRO 537A. Community Programs Laboratory—A. 2 Units.

The first of a three-quarter sequence for health promotion and education (HPRO) majors; a stand-alone laboratory for other majors. Students operationalize qualitative research methods in a laboratory environment by conducting observational assessments, windshield surveys, and personal interviews; participating in focus groups; and compiling secondary data for completing a community-needs assessment. HPRO students use their data to plan a health education intervention for their target/priority population during Winter Quarter; during Spring Quarter they implement and evaluate their programs.

HPRO 537B. Community Programs Laboratory—B. 2 Units.

Student designs marketing and evaluation plans for community-based health education program. Implements and evaluates programs developed during HPRO 537A.

HPRO 537C. Community Programs Laboratory—C. 1 Unit.

Students continue their marketing plan while implementing and evaluating their programs in the community. Students write a plan for program sustainability with community organizations as stakeholders.

HPRO 538. Health Education Program Development and Evaluation. 3 Units.

Uses program-planning theories and models with diagnostic techniques to design, deliver, and evaluate health promotion and education programs in a variety of settings: community, occupational, educational, and health care. Presents steps in the health educational planning process, which involves: 1) conducting social, epidemiological, behavioral, environmental, ecological, educational, administrative, and policy assessments; 2) writing goals and objectives; 3) selecting appropriate intervention strategies; 4) integrating and applying behavioral and educational theories to interventions; 5) enhancing instructional delivery and design skills; and 6) evaluating the educational process and reporting results.

HPRO 539. Policy and Issues in Health Education. 3 Units.

Examines and discusses policy issues, trends, and strategies relating to health education—including but not limited to HIV/AIDS, women's health, injury prevention and control, tobacco and other drug issues, and health issues in ethnically diverse populations. Provides opportunities to develop and improve presentation skills. Project included.

HPRO 543. Writing for Health Professionals. 3 Units.

Writing by health professionals for popular, lay, or professional publications. Student selects journal or magazine, writes query letter, and prepares abstract and manuscript in final form for submission. Includes preparation of camera-ready art. Preparation of two publishable papers. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 544. Health Education Evaluation and Measurement. 3 Units.

Student selects and develops health education and psychosocial measurement instruments, determines validity and reliability of evaluation tools, provides overview of data-collection methods and protocols, analyzes and interprets results, and communicates evaluation findings. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 553. Addiction Theory and Program Development. 3 Units.

Applies addiction process theory in a practical way to program development. Emphasizes alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) problems, using case studies and extensive reading as part of a problem-solving approach. The epidemiological, pathological, physiological, psychological, and spiritual bases for prevention and treatment of addictions. Laboratory included.

HPRO 556. High-Risk Infants and Children: Policy and Programs. 3 Units.

Examines development of at-risk infants and children, and evaluates interventions that may modify cognitive and social outcomes. Takes into account medical risk factors, such as preterm birth, prenatal substance exposure, and respiratory distress; as well as social factors, such as gender and socioeconomic status. Critically analyzes the efficacy of early-intervention strategies, such as UNICEF's Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, child survival strategies, and the Initiative for the Girl Child; as well as U.S.-based programs such as Head Start. Examines legal, regulatory, and ethical issues.
Prerequisite: Physiology or consent of instructor.

HPRO 559. Lactation Management. 3 Units.

Analyzes the managerial and leadership roles of the health education specialist in both public and private health organizations. Emphasizes organizational structure and health communication; as well as managing, supervising, marketing, decision making, and other administrative roles.

HPRO 565. Tobacco Use: Prevention and Interventions. 3 Units.

The second part of a three-part, module-based course. Provides a comprehensive overview of the pathophysiology that underlies the health impact of tobacco use on individuals, families, and society; smoking behavior; pharmacodynamics of nicotine delivery; mechanisms of nicotine addiction, and most importantly, intervention methods (cessation and prevention). Includes individual, group, systems, and public intervention strategies; and provides the measures of efficacy for each. Incorporates terminology and concepts in epidemiology, anatomy, physiology, immunology, endocrinology, and biochemistry. Recommended that EPDM 561, 562 also be completed if HPRO 565 is taken as an elective.

HPRO 567. Reproductive Health. 3 Units.

Focuses on issues of reproductive health of women and men within the context of public health policy, community-based planning, and ethical decision making. Examines public health interventions at various points of the reproductive life cycle, including pubertal, preconceptual, and menopausal. Explores issues that affect health and fertility—including sexually transmitted diseases; reproductive tract infections; sexual violence, such as rape, incest, and genital mutilation; sexual trafficking; and nutritional and lifestyle issues impacting directly on reproductive health.

HPRO 573. Exercise Physiology I. 3 Units.

Basic preparation for development and leadership of exercise programs. Includes exercise physiology, training, acute and chronic effects of exercise, simple assessment of fitness, role of exercise in prevention of common health problems, and management of selected risk factors. Discusses endurance, strength, flexibility, and aerobic exercises. Laboratory included.

HPRO 578. Exercise Physiology II. 3 Units.

Physiologic basis of the normal body function during exercise. Emphasizes the training effects of aerobic exercise. Noninvasive laboratory methods of the study of the circulatory and respiratory systems. Laboratory included.
Prerequisite: HPRO 573; and basic physiology.

HPRO 586. Introduction to Preventive Care. 1 Unit.

Provides overview of preventive care's role within public health. Orientation to doctoral program, with attention to professional portfolio preparation. Limited to doctoral degree students in preventive care.

HPRO 587. Preventive Care Practice Management. 2 Units.

Provides overview of issues and challenges in the operation of a preventive care practice. Emphasizes billing and reimbursement issues, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the preventive care specialist. Limited to doctoral degree students in preventive care.

HPRO 588. Health Behavior Theory and Research. 4 Units.

Analyzes in-depth factors contributing to decisions about health behavior. Theory and research relevant to individual, family, organization, and community behavior. Readings from original theorists and researchers on topics related to health behavior. Emphasizes development of critical-thinking skills, professional written work, and oral presentation. Application of theory to development of a basic research proposal. Limited to doctoral degree students. Consent of instructors for nondoctoral degree students.
Prerequisite: HPRO 509; or equivalent.

HPRO 589. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Units.

Applies qualitative methods to instrument design, sampling, and data collection. Focuses on public health issues, ethics, and theory-building. Supervised needs assessment in a selected community.

HPRO 590. Worksite Wellness. 3 Units.

Prepares students to enter the field of corporation wellness as leaders not only in developing, implementing, and evaluating wellness work-site programs; but also in decreasing the burden on corporation health, morale, budget, and performance caused by lifestyle-related diseases.

HPRO 606. Motivational Interviewing. 2 Units.

Introduces students to the effective methodology of motivational interviewing. Explores the techniques and theories associated with this treatment method. Covers in detail the skills needed to successfully motivate patients toward healthier lifestyles. Gives attention to practical information needed to be a successful health professional. P.H. (preventive care) degree.
Prerequisite: Minimum of 90 units of course work toward Dr.

HPRO 608. Advanced Seminar in Health Education. 2 Units.

Studies current issues in health promotion and education from the standpoint of historical setting. Explores emerging challenges to professional preparation in health promotion and education, and the place of professional health educators in the practice of public health. Must be taken for a total of 6 units. Limited to health education doctoral degree students.

HPRO 614. Seminar in Maternal and Child Health Practice. 3 Units.

Analyzes issues, trends, and current practices affecting maternal and child health. Discussion and student participation. Limited to Track I maternal-child health practitioners.

HPRO 685. Preliminary Research Experience. 2 Units.

Experience gained in various aspects of research under the guidance of a faculty member and by participation in an ongoing project. Must be completed prior to beginning dissertation/research project. Limited to doctoral degree students.

HPRO 696. Directed Study/Special Project. 1-4 Units.

Individual arrangements for advanced students to study under the guidance of a program faculty member. May include reading, literature review, or other special projects. Minimum of thirty hours required for each unit of credit. A maximum of 4 units applicable to any master's degree program.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and of program advisor.

HPRO 697. Dissertation Proposal. 1-10 Units.

Doctoral student develops the written dissertation proposal and collaborates with doctoral dissertation committee chair on mutually agreed-upon objectives, which will serve as the basis for evaluation. Culminates in a written and oral dissertation proposal defense and advancement to candidacy.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of comprehensive exams.

HPRO 698. Dissertation. 1-14 Units.

Student prepares a manuscript presenting results of the doctoral research study. Limited to doctoral degree candidates.
Prerequisite: Advancement to Candidacy.

HPRO 704A. Internship. 2 Units.

Training and supervised experience (minimum of 100 clock hours) with other health professionals in applied settings. Opportunity to work with individuals, families, and groups in assessing health and building relationships conducive to health-promoting behavior changes. Limited to doctoral (preventive care) degree students. May be repeated for a total of up to 12 units.

HPRO 704B. Internship. 4 Units.

Training and supervised experience (minimum of 200 clock hours) with other health professionals in applied settings. Opportunity to work with individuals, families, and groups in assessing health and building relationships conducive to health-promoting behavior changes. Limited to doctoral (preventive care) degree students. May be repeated for a total of up to 12 units.

HPRO 704C. Internship. 6 Units.

Training and supervised experience (minimum of 300 clock hours) with other health professionals in applied settings. Opportunity to work with individuals, families, and groups in assessing health and building relationships conducive to health-promoting behavior changes. Limited to doctoral (preventive care) degree students.

HPRO 704D. Internship. 8 Units.

Training and supervised experience with other health professionals in applied settings. Opportunity to work with individuals, families, and groups in assessing health and building relationships conducive to health-promoting behavior changes. Limited to doctoral (preventive care) degree students. A ten-week (40 hours/week) field internship.